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3684 search results for When I Was Your Man

  • Survivorcagayan_ljmckanas_1200_home_top_story

    Interview: L.J. McKanas talks 'Survivor: Cagayan'

    Type: Post | Date: Saturday, Apr 19, 2014

    Why Tony impresses him, Trish disappoints him and Woo isn't playing the game
  • Lee-brice_home_top_story

    Interview: Lee Brice on Luke Bryan, Garth Brooks, and Bruno Mars

    Type: Post | Date: Friday, Apr 18, 2014

    Why his ACM song of the year, 'I Drive Your Truck,' still chokes him up
  • Orphan-black_home_top_story

    'Orphan Black' review: Sarah is on the run - but she's not out of moves

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    The series returns with more whipsaw plot twists and the same high stakes
  • Shriek_home_top_story

    11 Criminally Underused Lady Villains 'The Amazing Spider-Man' Is Wasting

    Type: Gallery | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    Powers/Weapons: Her scorpion suit which give her enhanced speed and strength....
  • Survivor_041614_652_home_top_story

    Recap: 'Survivor: Cagayan' - 'Bag of Tricks'

    Type: Post | Date: Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

    Even in a position, one castaway has to resist paranoia
  • Americanidol_s13_top7_652_home_top_story

    Recap: 'American Idol' Season 13 - Top 7 Performances - Competitor's Pick

    Type: Post | Date: Wednesday, Apr 16, 2014

    The 'Idol' finalists sing songs selected by their rivals
  • Girlfriends: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010

    Includes:Girlfriends: Toe Sucking (2000) Girlfriends: Hip-Ocracy (2000) Girlfriends: I Pity the Fool (2000) Girlfriends: Girlfrenzy (2000) Girlfriends: One Night Stand? (2000) Girlfriends: The Remains of the Date (2000) Girlfriends: Pregnant Pause (2000) Girlfriends: The Importance of Being Frank (2000) Girlfriends: Never a Bridesmaid (2000) Girlfriends: Fried Turkey (2000) Girlfriends: Everything Fishy Ain't Fish (2000) Girlfriends: Loose Lips Sink Relationships (2001) Girlfriends: Diss-regard (2001) Girlfriends: The Fallout (2001) Girlfriends: Jamaic-Up? (2001) Girlfriends: A Kiss Before Lying (2001) Girlfriends: Just Say No (2001) Girlfriends: Un-Treatable (2001) Girlfriends: The Declaration of Lynndependence (2001) Girlfriends: Friends, Colleagues, Brothers (2001) Girlfriends: Old Dog (2001) Girlfriends: Bad Timing (2001) Girlfriends: They've Gotta Have It (2001) Girlfriends: The List (2001) Girlfriends: You Better Watch Out (2001) Girlfriends: Mom's the Word (2001) Girlfriends: Maya Takes a Stan (2001) Girlfriends: Trick or Truth (2001) Girlfriends: Joan's Birthday Suit (2001) Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He? (2001) Girlfriends: Buh-Bye (2001) Girlfriends: A Full Court Conspiracy (2001) Girlfriends: The Burning Vagina Monologues (2001) Girlfriends: I Have a Dream House (2002) Girlfriends: Can't Stan Ya! (2002) Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He II - The Last Chapter (2002) Girlfriends: Sister, Sistah (2002) Girlfriends: Take Me Out to the Ballgame (2002) Girlfriends: X Does Not Mark the Spot (2002) Girlfriends: My Mother, Myself (2002) Girlfriends: Happy Valentine's Day...Baby? (2002) Girlfriends: Sex, Lies and Books (2002) Girlfriends: A Stiff Good Man Is Easy to Find (2002) Girlfriends: Runaway Bridesmaid (2002) Girlfriends: The Pact (2002) Girlfriends: Where Everyone Knows My Name (2002) Girlfriends: Too Much Sharin' (2002) Girlfriends: Blood Is Thicker than Liquor (2002) Girlfriends: The Fast Track and the Furious (2002) Girlfriends: The Wedding, Part I (2002) Girlfriends: The Wedding, Part II (2002) Girlfriends: Coming to Terms (2002) Girlfriends: Getting Our Act Together (2002) Girlfriends: Secrets and Eyes (2002) Girlfriends: Star Craving Mad (2002) Girlfriends: Don't Leave Me a Loan (2002) Girlfriends: Invasion of the Gold Digger (2002) Girlfriends: Blinded by the Lights (2002) Girlfriends: Handling Baggage (2002) Girlfriends: The Mommy Returns (2002) Girlfriends: A Little Romance (2002) Girlfriends: Santa v. Monica (2002) Girlfriends: Take This Poem and Call Me in the Morning (2002) Girlfriends: Howdy Partner (2002) Girlfriends: Single Mama Drama (2002) Girlfriends: Into the Woods (2002) Girlfriends: Just Dessert (2002) Girlfriends: Taming of the Realtress (2002) Girlfriends: Childs in Charge (2002) Girlfriends: Merry Ex-Mas (2003) Girlfriends: On the Couch (2003) Girlfriends: New York Unbound (2003) Girlfriends: Love Thy Neighbor (2003) Girlfriends: A Comedy of Eros (2003) Girlfriends: Leggo My Ego (2003) Girlfriends: Don't You Want Me, Baby (2003) Girlfriends: Between Brock and a Hard Place (2003) Girlfriends: Prophet and Loss (2003) Girlfriends: Good Catch or Bad Hop? (2003) Girlfriends: Some Enchanted Evening (2003) Girlfriends: If It's Broke, Fix It (2003) Girlfriends: Snoop, There It Is (2003) Girlfriends: You Ain't Gotta Go Home but...You Know the Rest (2003) Girlfriends: Hopelessly Devoted to Two (2003) Girlfriends: Inherit the Lynn (2003) Girlfriends: And Baby Makes Four (2003) Girlfriends: Viva Las Vegas (2003) Girlfriends: Love, Peace and Hair Grease (2003) Girlfriends: Wieners and Losers (2003) Girlfriends: He Loves Her, He Loves Her Not (2003) Girlfriends: A Partnerless Partner (2003) Girlfriends: Just the Three of Us (2003) Girlfriends: New York Bound (2003) Girlfriends: L.A. Bound (2004) Girlfriends: The Rabbit Died (2004) Girlfriends: All in a Panic (2004) Girlfriends: Great Sexpectations (2004) Girlfriends: The Way We Were (2004) Girlfriends: See J-Spot Run (2004) Girlfriends: Good News, Bad News (2004) Girlfriends: Kids Say the Darndest Things (2004) Girlfriends: Finn-ished (2004) Girlfriends: The Bridges of Fresno County (2004) Girlfriends: Wedding on the Rocks (2004) Girlfriends: Maybe, Baby (2004) Girlfriends: Too Big for Her Britches (2004) Girlfriends: The Mother of All Episodes (2004) Girlfriends: When Hearts Attack (2004) Girlfriends: Who's Your Daddy (2004) Girlfriends: Porn to Write (2004) Girlfriends: All the Creatures Were Stirring (2004) Girlfriends: P.D.A.-D.O.A. (2004) Girlfriends: ...With a Twist (2004) Girlfriends: A Mile in Her Loubous (2004) Girlfriends: The J-Spot (2004) Girlfriends: ...Ain't Nothing Over There (2005) Girlfriends: Party Over Here (2005) Girlfriends: I Don't Wanna Be a Player No More (2005) Girlfriends: It's Raining Men (2005) Girlfriends: I'll Be There for You...But Not Right Now (2005) Girlfriends: Oh, Hell Yes: The Seminar (2005) Girlfriends: And Nanny Makes Three (2005) Girlfriends: Latching On and Lashing Out (2005) Girlfriends: Judging Edward (2005) Girlfriends: Sleeping Dogs (2005) Girlfriends: My Business, Not Your Business (2005) Girlfriends: All God's Children (2005) Girlfriends: The Music in Me (2005) Girlfriends: The It Girl (2005) Girlfriends: Work in Progress (2005) Girlfriends: Fits & Starts (2005) Girlfriends: Odds & Ends (2005) Girlfriends: Everything Old Is New Again (2005) Girlfriends: Trial and Errors (2005) Girlfriends: Hot Girl on Girl Action (2005) Girlfriends: Game Over (2005) Girlfriends: The Game (2005) Girlfriends: A House Divided (2006) Girlfriends: After the Storm (2006) Girlfriends: In Too Deep (2006) Girlfriends: Bad Blood (2006) Girlfriends: Hustle & Dough (2006) Girlfriends: Everybody Hates Monica (2006) Girlfriends: If You Can't Stand the Heat, Get Out of the Boonies (2006) Girlfriends: Just Joan (2006) Girlfriends: Karaoke-Dokee (2006) Girlfriends: He Had a Dream (2006) Girlfriends: To Be Determined (2006) Girlfriends: ...It's Been Determined (2006) Girlfriends: I'll Have a Blue Line Christmas (2006) Girlfriends: Wrong Side of the Tracks (2006) Girlfriends: I Want My Baby Back (2006) Girlfriends: Hot for Preacher (2006) Girlfriends: Time to Man Up (2006) Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He III: This Time It's Personal (2006) Girlfriends: What Had Happened Was... (2006) Girlfriends: Church Lady (2006) Girlfriends: A Dingo Ate My Dream House (2006) Girlfriends: Operation Does She Yield (2006) Girlfriends: Stand and Deliver (2007) Girlfriends: What's Black-a-Lackin'? (2007) Girlfriends: Adapt to Adopt (2007) Girlfriends: Deck the Halls With Bags and Folly (2007) Girlfriends: Save the Last Dance (2007) Girlfriends: Spree to Be Free (2007) Girlfriends: Range of Emotions (2007) Girlfriends: Baghdad, My Bad (2007) Girlfriends: Where Did Lynn-digo? (2007) Girlfriends: Losing It (2007) Girlfriends: Good Grief (2007) Girlfriends: Snap Back (2007) Girlfriends: R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Find Out What it Means to William (2007) Girlfriends: Toe Sucking No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Hip-Ocracy No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I Pity the Fool No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Girlfrenzy No synopsis available. Girlfriends: One Night Stand? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Remains of the Date No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Pregnant Pause No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Importance of Being Frank No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Never a Bridesmaid No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Fried Turkey No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Everything Fishy Ain't Fish No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Loose Lips Sink Relationships No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Diss-regard No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Fallout No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Jamaic-Up? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Kiss Before Lying No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Just Say No No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Un-Treatable No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Declaration of Lynndependence No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Friends, Colleagues, Brothers No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Old Dog No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Bad Timing No synopsis available. Girlfriends: They've Gotta Have It No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The List No synopsis available. Girlfriends: You Better Watch Out No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Mom's the Word No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Maya Takes a Stan No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Trick or Truth No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Joan's Birthday Suit No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Buh-Bye No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Full Court Conspiracy No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Burning Vagina Monologues No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I Have a Dream House No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Can't Stan Ya! No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He II - The Last Chapter No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Sister, Sistah No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Take Me Out to the Ballgame No synopsis available. Girlfriends: X Does Not Mark the Spot No synopsis available. Girlfriends: My Mother, Myself No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Happy Valentine's Day...Baby? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Sex, Lies and Books No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Stiff Good Man Is Easy to Find No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Runaway Bridesmaid No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Pact No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Where Everyone Knows My Name No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Too Much Sharin' No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Blood Is Thicker than Liquor No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Fast Track and the Furious No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Wedding, Part I No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Wedding, Part II No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Coming to Terms No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Getting Our Act Together No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Secrets and Eyes No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Star Craving Mad No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Don't Leave Me a Loan No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Invasion of the Gold Digger No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Blinded by the Lights No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Handling Baggage No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Mommy Returns No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Little Romance No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Santa v. Monica No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Take This Poem and Call Me in the Morning No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Howdy Partner No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Single Mama Drama No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Into the Woods No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Just Dessert No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Taming of the Realtress No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Childs in Charge No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Merry Ex-Mas No synopsis available. Girlfriends: On the Couch No synopsis available. Girlfriends: New York Unbound No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Love Thy Neighbor No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Comedy of Eros No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Leggo My Ego No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Don't You Want Me, Baby No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Between Brock and a Hard Place No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Prophet and Loss No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Good Catch or Bad Hop? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Some Enchanted Evening No synopsis available. Girlfriends: If It's Broke, Fix It No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Snoop, There It Is No synopsis available. Girlfriends: You Ain't Gotta Go Home but...You Know the Rest No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Hopelessly Devoted to Two No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Inherit the Lynn No synopsis available. Girlfriends: And Baby Makes Four No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Viva Las Vegas No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Love, Peace and Hair Grease No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Wieners and Losers No synopsis available. Girlfriends: He Loves Her, He Loves Her Not No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Partnerless Partner No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Just the Three of Us No synopsis available. Girlfriends: New York Bound No synopsis available. Girlfriends: L.A. Bound No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Rabbit Died No synopsis available. Girlfriends: All in a Panic No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Great Sexpectations No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Way We Were No synopsis available. Girlfriends: See J-Spot Run No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Good News, Bad News No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Kids Say the Darndest Things No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Finn-ished No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Bridges of Fresno County No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Wedding on the Rocks No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Maybe, Baby No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Too Big for Her Britches No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Mother of All Episodes No synopsis available. Girlfriends: When Hearts Attack No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Who's Your Daddy No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Porn to Write No synopsis available. Girlfriends: All the Creatures Were Stirring No synopsis available. Girlfriends: P.D.A.-D.O.A. No synopsis available. Girlfriends: ...With a Twist No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Mile in Her Loubous No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The J-Spot No synopsis available. Girlfriends: ...Ain't Nothing Over There No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Party Over Here No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I Don't Wanna Be a Player No More No synopsis available. Girlfriends: It's Raining Men No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I'll Be There for You...But Not Right Now No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Oh, Hell Yes: The Seminar No synopsis available. Girlfriends: And Nanny Makes Three No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Latching On and Lashing Out No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Judging Edward No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Sleeping Dogs No synopsis available. Girlfriends: My Business, Not Your Business No synopsis available. Girlfriends: All God's Children No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Music in Me No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The It Girl No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Work in Progress No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Fits & Starts No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Odds & Ends No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Everything Old Is New Again No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Trial and Errors No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Hot Girl on Girl Action No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Game Over No synopsis available. Girlfriends: The Game No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A House Divided No synopsis available. Girlfriends: After the Storm No synopsis available. Girlfriends: In Too Deep No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Bad Blood No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Hustle & Dough No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Everybody Hates Monica No synopsis available. Girlfriends: If You Can't Stand the Heat, Get Out of the Boonies No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Just Joan No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Karaoke-Dokee No synopsis available. Girlfriends: He Had a Dream No synopsis available. Girlfriends: To Be Determined No synopsis available. Girlfriends: ...It's Been Determined No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I'll Have a Blue Line Christmas No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Wrong Side of the Tracks No synopsis available. Girlfriends: I Want My Baby Back No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Hot for Preacher No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Time to Man Up No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Willie or Won't He III: This Time It's Personal No synopsis available. Girlfriends: What Had Happened Was... No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Church Lady No synopsis available. Girlfriends: A Dingo Ate My Dream House No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Operation Does She Yield No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Stand and Deliver No synopsis available. Girlfriends: What's Black-a-Lackin'? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Adapt to Adopt No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Deck the Halls With Bags and Folly No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Save the Last Dance No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Spree to Be Free No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Range of Emotions No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Baghdad, My Bad No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Where Did Lynn-digo? No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Losing It No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Good Grief No synopsis available. Girlfriends: Snap Back No synopsis available. Girlfriends: R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Find Out What it Means to William No synopsis available.
  • G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions (1985) G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet (1985) G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush (1985) G.I. Joe: The Invaders (1985) G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff (1985) G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers (1985) G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace (1985) G.I. Joe: The Funhouse (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures (1985) G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World (1985) G.I. Joe: Satellite Down (1985) G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves (1985) G.I. Joe: Money to Burn (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate (1985) G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! (1985) G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens (1985) G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect (1985) G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren (1985) G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming (1985) G.I. Joe: The Germ (1985) G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster (1985) G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam (1985) G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons (1985) G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation (1985) G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot (1985) G.I. Joe: The Gods Below (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town (1985) G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra (1985) G.I. Joe: Excalibur (1985) G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent (1985) G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake (1985) G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five (1985) G.I. Joe: Cold Slither (1985) G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One (1985) G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two (1985) G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains (1986) G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1986) G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers (1986) G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out (1986) G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions (1986) G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault (1986) G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World (1986) G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece (1986) G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two (1986) G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One (1986) G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me (1986) G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls (1986) G.I. Joe: Cobrathon (1986) G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana (1986) G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! (1986) G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper (1986) G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South (1986) G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg (1986) G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic (1986) G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... (1986) G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier (1986) G.I. Joe: Computer Complications (1986) G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday (1986) G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things (1986) G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep (1986) G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance (1986) G.I. Joe: Twenty Questions The Joe team's war games are interrupted by Hector Ramirez, muckraking host of the TV series "Twenty Questions." Ramirez has brought along a peacenik named Arnold, who claims that the Joes are frauds who use the threat of Cobra attack as a means to cheat the American taxpayers. Hoping to prove Arnold wrong, Shipwreck conducts an unauthorized tour of the Joes' headquarters -- only to discover that Arnold is really the evil Baroness in disguise. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Twenty Questions" made its American TV debut on October 2, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eye For an Eye A fierce battle between the Cobras and the Joes has devastating consequences on a family of innocent bystanders. Though his loved ones are safe, Charles Fairmont is enraged over the destruction of his home. Invading the Joes' base in search of revenge, Fairmont finds an unexpected ally in the form of Lady Jaye, who feels personally responsible for the man's plight. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "Eye for an Eye" made its American TV debut on November 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part adventure, the Joes have rescued Dusty from prison, certain that his traitorous behavior was borne of desperation over the plight of his sick mother. But can Dusty be reformed, and will he prove a valuable member of the Joe team? Apparently not: When Cobra tries to test its new mind-control gas on the Joes, Dusty assists the villains every step of the way. Be assured, however, that the story is not quite over yet. Written by Buzz Dixon, part two of the "The Traitor" originally aired in America on November 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Skeleton in the Closet Upon receiving an inheritance, Joe member Lady Jaye journeys to her ancestral home in Scotland. Feeling that something is amiss, LJ soon learns the awful truth: She is related to her longtime enemy Destro. The ensuing battle royal between the Joes and Cobras turns out to be the result of a carefully mapped scheme by another old enemy. A neat twist caps this episode, which was written by Flint Dille. "Skeleton in the Closet" first aired in America on December 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Countdown for Zartan Zartan is hired by Cobra Commander to blow up a peace conference at World Wide Defense Center, thereby covering up secret information about Cobra's terrorist activities. Posing as a kidnapped French scientist, Zartan is exposed by Joe member Spirit -- who is promptly abducted by Storm Shadow. The other members of the Joe Team race against the clock to locate and disarm Zartan's bomb. Written by Christy Marx, "Countdown for Zartan" first aired in America on September 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part Two In the concluding chapter of a two-part story, Shipwreck finally realizes that his "new" life as a family man in the town of Springfield is actually a sham, created by Cobra to force him to reveal the deadly water-to-explosive formula locked in his subconscious. Rescued from madness by Polly, Shipwreck does his best to foil Cobra's plans -- if only he can locate the rest of the Joe Team. But there's a tragic price to pay for the good guys' ultimate victory. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 2" first aired in America on December 13, 1985, as the final episode of G.I. Joe's first TV season. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: No Place Like Springfield, Part One In the first episode of a two-part adventure, Dr. Melany's new formula for changing water into explosive is planted in Shipwreck's subconscious -- and only Lady Jaye knows the code word that will release the formula. Upon awakening from an unusually deep sleep, Shipwreck discovers that several years have passed, and that his has settled down to a cozy domestic existence with his wife, Mara (formerly a mermaid), and his daughter. Slowly but surely, however, Shipwreck senses that something is not quite right about his new surroundings. Written by Steve Gerber, "No Place Like Springfield, Pt. 1" first aired in America on December 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Great Alaskan Land Rush Claiming to a have found a legal loophole in Seward's Alaskan purchase of 1867, Cobra and a shifty used car dealer named Gorgy Potemkin gain full control of Alaska. Their plans include using the 49th state as a power base to attack the rest of the world. Once again, the Joes join forces with the Soviet Oktober Guard to foil Cobra's scheme. Written by David Carren, "The Great Alaskan Land Rush" was first telecast in America on December 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Invaders Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are held in thrall by an apparent alien invasion of Earth. It soon develops, however, that the "invasion" has been orchestrated by Cobra, as part of a scheme to destroy both Moscow and Washington and establish Cobra as the world's only superpower. This time around, the Joes are joined by their Soviet counterparts, the Oktober Guard, in thwarting the villain's plans. Written by Dennis O'Neil, "The Invaders" originally aired in America on November 29, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Wrong Stuff Could it be that writers Stanley Ralph Ross and Flint Dille had a certain Atlanta-based TV mogul in mind when they wrote this episode of G.I. Joe? On this occasion, Cobra removes all space satellites from orbit, the better to create a worldwide broadcasting monopoly, Cobra Network Television. By offering twisted "message" sitcoms like "Father's No Beast" and even (horrors!) changing the endings of classic old films, the CTN is aimed at controlling the minds of all earthlings -- or at least, all cable subscribers. "The Wrong Stuff" first aired in America on November 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Pit of Vipers The G.I. Joe team is placed under the command of the new super-computer Watchdog, which has ostensibly been designed to seek out Cobra targets. Little do the heroes realize that Watchdog has been created by the Cobras themselves, and is programmed to send the Joes far off the beaten track, leaving their headquarters vulnerable to Cobra's deadly Pit Viper attacks. James M. Ward wrote the script, from an original story by Flint Dille. "The Pit of Vipers" originally aired in the U.S. on November 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Memories of Mara The titular Mara is a blue-skinned women whom we first see wearing a Cobra diving suit. Rescued by Joe Team member Shipwreck, Mara reveals that she is the half-human, half-fish result of a misfire Cobra experiment aimed at enabling humans to remain underwater indefinitely. With Mara's help, the Joes try to locate the U.S.S. Nerka, a submarine stolen by Cobra. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Memories of Mara" first aired in the U.S. on November 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Three In the third episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Joe Team members Lady Jaye, Flint, Shipwreck, and Snake Eyes have managed to escape the perils presented them in the previous episode, "Rendezvous in the City of the Dead." A new ally is introduced in the form of a sexy nightclub singer named Satin. Cobra functionary Zartan manages to activate the control cubes, setting off a chain events culminating in a dangerous encounter with killer seals on an iceberg. Written by Ron Friedman, "Three Cubes to Darkness" first aired in America on September 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Two In the second episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, the G.I. Joe team leads a counteroffensive against Cobra in hopes of regaining Space Station Delta. Joe members Shipwreck and Snake-Eyes are able to steal some of the all-important control cubes and a laser weapon, leading to a near-fatal escapade in a volcano called the Devil's Playground. Meanwhile, the dreaded Dreadnoks delighting in tormenting the captured Joes who have been forced into slave labor on Delta. Written by Ron Friedman, Rendezvous in the City of the Dead first aired in America on September 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Operation Mind Menace Taking control of the minds of several innocent civilians, Cobra artificially expands their powers, organizing his captives into an offensive army. Among these new mind-slaves is Tommy, the brother of G.I. Joe team member Airborne. Racing to Tommy's rescue, Airborne and Flash soon find themselves in need of rescuing. Written by Martin Pasko, "Operation Mind Menace" made its American TV debut on October 15, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Funhouse Cobra makes no effort to hide the fact that it has kidnapped five of the world's top scientists. It is all part of Cobra Commander's scheme to wreak a terrible vengeance on the G.I. Joe team. Lured to a South American island, the Joes find themselves at the mercy of Cobra's booby traps in a simulated funhouse -- and never have a rollercoaster and shooting gallery seemed more sinister. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Funhouse" first aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Creatures This time, Cobra has gotten hold of a device called Hi-Freq, invented by one Dr. Lucifer. The device enables the villains to gain mind control over all the animals of the world. To test Hi-Freq, Cobra kidnaps G.I. Joe team members Mutt, Junkyard. and Ripcord as human guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the other Joes try to win over Dr. Lucifer by having Lady Jaye pose as the scientist's sweetheart, Dr. Attila. Written by Kimmer Ringwald, "Cobra's Creatures" made its first American TV appearance on September 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Jungle Trap In its efforts to harness the raw energy supplies in the center of the earth, Cobra kidnaps eminent scientist Dr. Shakoor. Forced to do Cobra's bidding, Shakoor devises the awesome Vulcan Machine. Meanwhile, the G.I. Joe team endeavors to rescue the missing scientist -- a task comparable to finding a needle in the world's largest haystack. Written by future Batman: The Animated Series maven Paul Dini, "Jungle Trap" originally aired in America on September 27, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Stops the World Cobra attempts to gain control of the world's fuel supplies so that the leaders of Earth will knuckle under to his demands. With each passing hour, Cobra utilizes his weaponry to destroy another oil tanker. The G.I. Joe teams races against the clock to track down the source of the destruction, and in the process, team members Duke and Ace find themselves imprisoned in an all-but-impenetrable jungle. Written by Steve Gerber, "Cobra Stops the World" first aired in America on September 26, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Satellite Down Breaker manages to force a G.I. Joe spy satellite stolen by Cobra to crash somewhere in the African jungle. Both the Joe and Cobra teams race into unchartered territory to recover the satellite, only to discover that the device has been adopted as a "god" by a lost tribe called the Primords. This episode contains a cute closing gag involving the Primords' reaction to that demon machine known as Television. Written by Ted Pederson, "Satellite Down" first aired in the U.S. on September 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Red Rocket's Glare Extensive Enterprises, a front organization for Cobra, uses a vicious gang of bikers to force the owners of the Red Rocket Drive-Thru Diners to sell out at bargain-basement prices. It is the first step in a scheme to install sophisticated anti-personnel weapons throughout the country. But Cobra has not taken into consideration the G.I. Joe team -- specifically, team member Roadblock, whose aunt and uncle own one of the beleaguered Red Rocket restaurants. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Red Rocket's Glare" originally aired in the U.S. on September 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Soundwaves This time, Cobra has gotten hold of an anti-aircraft gun which emits sonic waves for sinister purposes. Acting quickly, the villains threaten to use the weapon to destroy the oil resources of a Middle Eastern nation. But the G.I. Joe team has likewise swung into action, and they're not about to be "soundly" beaten by the Cobra forces. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Soundwaves" originally aired in America on October 17, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Money to Burn Cobra destroys America's economy by vaporizing all of the country's money. He then takes steps to gain complete control by distributing his own personalized currency. To counteract this financial disaster, G.I. Joe team member Lady Jaye poses as Cobra's filthy-rich "client" Gloria Vonderhoss. Making its first American television appearance on October 14, 1985 (a few weeks later in some local markets), "Money to Burn" was written by Roger Slifer. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra's Candidate In the midst of a heated political campaign, Cobra Commander hopes to sway voters to his handpicked candidate, Robert Harper, by casting Harper in the role of persecuted underdog. To that end, Cobra enlists the aid of a tough street gang, who stages riots which appear to be the handiwork of Harper's opponent, Whittier Greenway. The plan is foiled when a hitherto unsupsected link between the street gang and the G.I. Joe team is revealed. Written by Gordon Kent, "Cobra's Candidate" originally aired in the U.S. on October 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lights! Camera! Cobra! Several of the G.I. Joe team's more contentious members are hired as technical advisors for the Hollywood epic "The G.I. Joe Story." Striving for realism, the producers have stored several authentic Joe and Cobra weapons in their prop shed, including a genuine Cobra Firebat plane. In his efforts to steal the plane, Cobra commander must rely upon the mercurial Destro and the unpredictable Dreadnoks. The story outcome is determined by the studio's crack team of special effects wizards. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Lights! Camera! Cobra!" first aired in the U.S. on October 10, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Phantom Brigade Cobra Commander uses an elderly gypsy woman to conjure up three dangerous ghosts: a Roman legionnaire, a Mongol warrior, and an American WWI flying ace. He then sends them into battle against the G.I. Joe team, secure in the knowledge that phantoms can't be killed or injured. The Joes attempt to mount a counteroffensive by appealing to the dormant patriotism of the American ghost. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "The Phantom Brigade" originally aired in America on October 9, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, Cobra has managed to cut off funding for the G.I. Joe team with the use of his Synthoids, humanlike creatures programmed to do the villains' bidding. Even worse, Joe member Duke has been replaced by his Synthoid clone. Managing to escape Cobra's clutches, Duke links up with his fellow Joes in an effort to stem the Synthoid invasion -- receiving unexpected assistance in the form of the evil Destro, who is again locked in a power struggle with his Cobra bosses. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 2" first aired in America on October 8, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Synthoid Conspiracy, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra infiltrates the committee responsible for funding the activities of the G.I. Joe team. The villains replace several key members with lookalike Synthoid, which have been programmed to bend exclusively to Cobra's will. Not only do the Joes lose their financial base, but to make matters worse, team member Duke is likewise replaced by a lookalike Synthoid. Written by Christy Marx, "The Synthoid Conspiracy, Pt. 1" first aired in America on October 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Haul Down the Heavens Cobra encamps itself at the North Pole, the better to use the powerful Ion Attractor to melt the polar ice cap and upset the ecological balance of the earth. To prevent this, G.I. Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, and Snow Job, together with a group of scientists, head to the Arctic, only to find out that the villains are more than prepared for such a counteroffensive. The episode's highlight is Lady Jaye's tone-deaf rendition of the U.S. Marine Hymn. Written by television cartoon veteran Buzz Dixon, "Haul Down the Heavens" originally aired in America on October 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Greenhouse Effect A non-polluting rocket fuel that causes plants to grow to enormous size is stolen by a member of the Crimson Guards. Chortling in glee, Cobra leader Destro plans to use the fuel to create an army of killer plants. The episode's climax is a bizarre, gargantuan "food fight" between the Cobras and the G.I. Joe team. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Greenhouse Effect" made its first American TV appearance on October 3, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Spell of the Siren The Baroness hatches another scheme to take over Cobra. Her first step is to harness the power of the Conch of the Siren to hypnotize the male team members of both the Cobras and the Joes. Inevitably, it is up to the female Joes -- and a few stray unaffected males who had been off base during the Siren's aural assault -- to rescue their comrades. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Spell of the Siren" was first broadcast in America on October 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Viper is Coming Responding to what they think are cryptic challenges from Cobra, the G.I. Joe team, led by Barbecue, heads to various parts of the world, armed for battle. Only after the dust is settled do they realize that it's all a false alarm. The climax of David Carren's teleplay was obviously inspired by one of the oldest and most familiar schoolyard jokes in academic history. "The Viper Is Coming" originally aired in America on October 24, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Germ A member of the Crimson Guard steals a vial containing Bacteria X. The usual red tape delays delivery of this vial to Destro. In the meantime, the Bacteria X is accidentally mixed with a new growth serum, resulting in a huge, gelatine monstrosity. The G.I. Joe team tries to destroy this hideous new threat, only to succeeding in doubling the danger at hand. Roger Slifer's script is a sly parody of the classic horror cheapie The Blob -- and what an ending! "The Germ" originally aired in America on October 23, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Battle for the Train of Gold Stealing a cassette containing the blueprints of Fort Knox, Cobra concocts a scheme to rob the gold treasury. At the behest of the Bureau of Engraving, the G.I. Joe team works undercover and awaits Cobra's inevitable strike. Though the villains succeed in disabling the Joes' vehicles and weapons, the good guys are able to borrow several of Kentucky's best thoroughbred racing horses during the final counteroffensive. Written by David Carren, "The Battle for the Train of Gold" first aired in America on October 16, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Four In the fourth episode of the five-part |Pyramid of Darkness, Bazooka and Alpine are rescued by martial artist Quick-Kick, who is prompted recruited into the G.I. Joe team. Continuing in their efforts to regain control of Space Station Delta from Cobra, the Joes end up in a graveyard of sunken ships called the Sea of Lost Souls. Unfortunately, the Cobra team manages to retrieve all four of the elusive control cubes, enabling them to form the all-powerful Pyramid which will give Cobra absolute control of the world -- and the means to destroy G.I. Joe once and for all. Written by Ron Friedman, "Chaos in the Sea of Lost Souls" first aired in America on September 19, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part One Two years after the introductory cartoon miniseries G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and one year after the following miniseries G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra, the daily animated G.I. Joe series proper commenced with part one of the five-episode adventure |Pyramids of Darkness. The opening chapter, "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe," was written by Ron Friedman, and was seen in most American markets on September 16, 1985. Things get off to a rousing start as the evil organization Cobra gains control of the G.I. Joe team's Delta space station, using Delta's weapon system to attack Joe headquarters and jam all of earth's electrical devices. Crucial to the action are four control cubes, which when placed in alignment create an all-powerful Pyramid, with which Cobras hopes to rule the world. "The Further Adventures of G.I. Joe" includes such trapping as a wild chase through Enterprise City and a flock of tribble-like creatures called the Fatal Fluffies, who can turn really bad in the wrong hands. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Lasers in the Night Cobra Commander draws up plans to steal the G.I. Joe team's new laser device. The theft is not so much for power as for ego; the Commander intends to create a monument to himself on the Moon. Meanwhile, a romance develops between Quick-Kick and pretty Joe Team trainee Amber, who, predictably, ends up being used as a pawn by the villains. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Lasers in the Night" was originally telecast in America on October 22, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gamesmaster G.I. Joe team members Lady Jaye and Flint, together with their deadly rivals Cobra Commander and the Baroness, are captured en masse by a looney named the Gamesmaster. The four enemies must join forces to stay alive during a (literal) manhunt on Gamesmaster's gadget-laden private island, which looks deceptively like a huge amusement park. Flint Dille's teleplay was obviously inspired by the classic Richard Connell short story The Most Dangerous Game. "The Gamesmaster" originally aired in the U.S. on October 21, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Where the Reptiles Roam A dude ranch in Western Texas is purchased by one of Cobra's dummy corporations. G.I. Joe team member Wild Bill and his friends now have their hands full trying to keep Cobra from gaining control of the solar energy farm next door to the ranch. When Cobra's weapons prove too powerful, Wild Bill cannily relies upon the unharnessed energy of a good old-fashioned cattle stampede. Written by Gerry and Carla Conway, "Where the Reptiles Roam" first aired in the U.S. on October 18, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Hearts and Cannons G.I. Joes Footloose and Dusty infiltrate Cobra's desert base, where captured scientist Dr. Nancy Winters is being forced to work on a powerful new Plasma Cannon Tank. Rescuing Nancy, the two Joes spend as much time vying for her affections as they do preventing Cobra from putting the Tank into operation. And what about that contentious local character named Jabal? Scripted by Alfred A. Pegel and Larry Houston from a story by Pegel, "Hearts and Cannons" was first broadcast in America on November 14, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Flint's Vacation Joe Team member Flint heads to the new housing project of Please Cove, hoping to spend some quality time with his cousin's family. He soon discovers that the project's inhabitants have been brainwashed and enslaved by Cobra -- and the dreaded Drednoks have been pressed into service as the local police force. Beth Bornstein's teleplay cleverly redefines the old sci-fi film classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers in TV-cartoon terms. "Flint's Vacation" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Primordial Plot Cobra steals a cache of petrified bones, then kidnaps cloning expert Dr. Massey. The result is a newly hatched crop of deadly dinosaurs, which even the Joes are at a loss to contain. And remember, folks, this was several years before the release of Spielberg's Jurassic Park. "Primordial Plot" was written by Donald F. Glut, one of the finest science fiction purveyors working in television. The episode originally aired in America on November 12, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Gods Below Once again, Cobra Commander is in need of quick cash to finance his world-domination scheme. To that end, the Commander lures the Joes into a treasure hunt at the newly excavated tomb of Osiris in Egypt. Things get complicated when the Joes and scientist Dr. Marsh are confronted by the evil Egyptian God Set, who sends them hurtling into the Realm of the Dead. Written by Gordon Kent, "The Gods Below" first aired in America on November 11, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town Christmas is coming and the Joes take upon themselves to distribute used toys to needy children. Unfortunately, the toy supply is infiltrated by Cobra's troops, who have been shrunken to action-figure size. In this reduced state, the villains contrive to sway public sentiment against the good-guy Joes. When all is said and done, however, this episode exists primarily to introduce Hasbro's latest line of G.I. Joe toy products. Scripted by Carla and Gerry Conway from a story by Roy and Dan Thomas, "Cobra CLAWs are Coming to Town" originally aired in America on November 7, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Eau de Cobra The title of this G.I. Joe episode refers to a new brand of perfume, sweet to the smell, but devastating in its effect. The Baroness hopes to ensnare wealthy shipowner Socrates Arties by applying the perfume, which turns males into mind slaves. Alas, the ensuing passions get wildly out of control, thanks to a jealous Destro. Written by Flint Dille, "Eau de Cobra" made its first American TV appearance on November 6, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Excalibur Crash-landing in England's Lake District, Storm Shadow recovers the long-lost Sword Excalibur. This arouses the interest of Destro, who begins laying plans to seize the sword for his own use. Meanwhile, the Joes attempt to forestall future Cobra attacks on England, a task made difficult by the country's habitually unpredictable weather. Written by Dan DiStefano, "Excalibur" first aired in America on November 1, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent Cobra has developed a mechanical sea serpent, which grows in size each time it devours a ship. Unfortunately, the villains lose control of the metallic monstrosity. Swallowing Cobras and Joes alike, the renegade serpent starts making a beeline for helpless New York City. Beany and Cecil this isn't! Written by Mary Skenes, "Bazooka Saw a Sea Serpent" was first telecast in America on October 31, 1985 -- perfect timing for a Halloween prank. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobra Quake A new technology has been developed to stop earthquakes before they begin. Cobra reverses that technology, intending to wreak havoc at a Third World Council peace conference in Japan. Assigned to guard the delegates, the Joes end up in a desperate search for Cobra's booby traps in three different, far-flung locations. Written by Ted Pederson, "Cobra Quake" made its first American TV appearance on October 28, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Pyramid of Darkness, Part Five In the concluding episode of the five-part Pyramid of Darkness, Cobra has successfully assembled the Pyramid, which will give them absolute and unquestioned power over the world. Fortunately, the G.I. Joe team manages to escape Cobra's clutches, bearing up against all manner of deadly devices, including an immobilizing heat beam. As the episode races to a conclusion, the viewer is never entirely certain who will emerge triumphant (hint: the coda finds the villains in their characteristic "It's all your fault" mode). Written by Ron Friedman, "Knotting Cobra's Coils" first aired in America on September 20, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cold Slither The Cobra Commander makes a startling discovery: He can no longer continue his efforts to rule the world because he is flat broke. Hoping to raise money in a hurry, the Commander utilizes the "hidden persuasion" method by hiring Zartan and the Drednoks to pose as musicians, then inserts mind-control messages in the music in order to enslave the group's fans. Alas, even three Joe members fall victim to the booby-trapped tunes. Something of a self-parody, this G.I. Joe episode was written by Charles Michael Hill. Though filmed as the final episode of season one, "Cold Slither" was telecast on December 2, 1985, long before the season finale. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Traitor, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, a desperate Dusty is coerced into selling information about the G.I. Joes' new bullet-proof chemical armor protection. The recipient of this top-secret information is Cobra, who has promised to pay the medical bills for Dusty's ailing mother. Arrested for treason, Dusty is sprung from prison by the Joes themselves, who believe that extenuating circumstance and not treachery motivated the prisoner's rash actions. But is Dusty genuinely a victim of circumstance, or a villain in disguise? Written by Buzz Dixon, part one of "The Traitor" first aired in America on November 25, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part Two In the conclusion of the two-part "Worlds Without End," Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler are still trapped in a parallel Earth, still at the mercy of the conquering Cobras. The Joes receive unexpected help from their old nemesis the Baroness -- who has been reinvented as a "good guy," in love with Steeler. Adopting a divide-and-conquer approach, the Baroness and the Joes foment a Cobra civil war. When the dust settles, three of the Joes choose to remain in the parallel world to continue fighting the good fight on behalf of their new confreres. Written by Martin Pasko, part two of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 5, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part One In the first episode of a two-part story, Cobra kidnaps the family members of the G.I. Joe team, including the parents of Quick Kick, Thunder, and Scarlett. Using mind control, the villains turn their captives against the Joes. It is all part of a scheme to steal some highly explosive crystals created by a misfire chemical reaction. First telecast in America on October 29, 1985, part one of "Captives of Cobra" was written by G.I. Joe stalwart Christy Marx. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Worlds Without End, Part One In this first episode of a two-part adventure, Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Airtight, Grunt, Clutch, and Steeler try to recover a matter transmutor stolen by the Dreadnoks. When the device is accidentally triggered, the Joes are hurled into a bizarre parallel world. Upon getting their bearings, they discover that, in this particular world, the Cobras have emerged triumphant over the Joes -- and the Drednoks are now the police force. Written by Martin Pasko, part one of "Worlds Without End" first aired in America on November 4, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Captives of Cobra, Part Two In the conclusion of a two-part story, several family members of the G.I. Joe team are still being held prisoner by Cobra, who hope to use their captives to retrieve some dangerously explosive chemicals. Team member Scarlett is able to rescue some of the captives -- who, because their minds have been enslaved by Cobra, prove to be almost as dangerous as their captors. Meanwhile, the villains overreach themselves by attempting to nab the extremely self-reliant family of Joe member Gung Ho. Written by Christy Marx, part two of "Captives of Cobra" was originally telecast in America on October 30, 1985. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Grey Hair and Growing Pains Serpentor steals Madame Versailles' special formula for making people younger -- or, if used improperly, making them older. Intending to exploit the treatment for his own evil purposes, Serpentor is unwittingly helped along by the vanity of Mme. Versailles' commercial spokespersons. In the course of events, three of the Joes age 50 years, another three team members regress into childhood, and Zarina and Mainframe stage a deadly confrontation. Written by Dave Marconi and Flint Dille, "Grey Hair and Growing Pains" first aired in America on October 14, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: In the Presence of Mine Enemies Joe Team member Slip Stream finds himself stranded on a monster-infested island with a beautiful female StratoViper named Raven. At first, the two natural enemies devote their energies to wiping one another out. But Raven changes her mind when she discovers that she has been set up as a "dead duck" by her leader, the Cobra Commander. Written by Chris Weber and Karen Wilson, "In the Presence of Mine Enemies" originally aired in America on November 19, 1986, as the final second-season episode of G.I. Joe. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sins of Our Fathers Dismissed from the Joe Team, Dial-Tone is unwittingly plunked in the middle of another power struggle between Cobra Commander and Serpentor. The action shifts to Scotland, ending up at Destro's ancestral castle. Both Joes and Cobras are forced to fight side by side when they are threatened by a horrible monster, summoned from the past. Scripted by Buzz Dixon from a story by Steve Gerber, "Sins of Our Fathers" first aired in America on November 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Joe's Night Out Three of the Joes -- Wet Suit, Leatherneck, and Dial-Tone -- accompany their dates to the opening of a trendy new night club. They are subsequently abducted along with all the other patrons when the "club" turns out to be a rocket in disguise, courtesy of Cobra. Hurled into deep space, the hostages will be returned only on condition that research scientist Dr. Melany assist Cobra in developing a powerful new plane engine. First broadcast in America on November 10, 1986, "Joe's Night Out" was written by David Schwartz. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Second Hand Emotions Dr. Mindbender and Serpentor develop an electronic organ capable of manipulating emotions. The villains play the organ at the wedding of LifeLine's sister, hoping thereby to force the Joe Team members into destroying themselves. Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue (blew up, that is). Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Second Hand Emotions" made its first U.S. television appearance on October 31, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Nightmare Assault The latest Cobra device for deviltry is something called the Somulator. Deploying this device, Dr. Mindbender is able to enter and alter the dreams of the Joe Team members, causing horrible nightmares which result in carelessness and a drop in morale. But the "good" doctor himself falls victim to LowLife's all-too-vivid nightmare, consisting of the combined dreams of the other Joes. Written by Marv Wolfman, "Nightmare Assault" originally aired in America on October 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Most Dangerous Thing in the World During General Hawk's absence, Cobra wreaks havoc upon the Joe's computer system. As a result, the troublesome Shipwreck, LifeLine, and Dial-Tone are promoted to the rank of General. Needless to say, the trio is hardly officer material, and it is up to Hawk to undo the ensuing damage -- and to save the weakened Joe force from an all-out Cobra attack. Written by Buzz Dixon, "The Most Dangerous Thing in the World" first aired in America on October 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece At the Suez Canal, the Cobras attempt to recover a valuable golden coil from the wreckage of a crashed UFO. They are confronted by the Joes, and in the ensuing struggle a laser beam is accidentally triggered. Within seconds, Joes and Cobras alike a hurtled back in time to ancient Greece, where they are welcomed and worshipped as gods. Scripted by Richard Merwin from a story by Flint Dille, "G.I. Joe and the Golden Fleece" first aired in the U.S. on October 27, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Ninja Holiday Attending a martial arts competition, Joe Team member Sgt. Slaughter is "chosen" by a group of sinister ninjas for a special assignment. Unwillingly submitting himself to rigorous training, Sarge discovers that he has been selected to assassinate Cobra Emperor Serpentor. During the climactic chase, the Joe team faces opposition from a variety of martial-arts experts, many of whom are dressed like Village People rejects! Written by Michael Charles Hill, "Ninja Holiday" originally aired in the U.S. on October 22, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Five In the concluding chapter of a five-part adventure, the worst has happened: Dr. Mindbender has successfully melded the DNA of several past conquerors into a single, super-powered Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Fortunately, Sgt. Slaughter and the rest of the G.I. Joe team manage to escape their Cobra captors and to mount a counteroffensive. Without giving away the ending, it can be noted that enough Joe and Cobra members are left standing to populate the subsequent episodes of G.I. Joe's second TV season. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 5" first aired in America on September 19, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Four In the fourth chapter of a five-part adventure, Cobra has successfully captured several members of the new G.I. Joe team. Dr. Mindbender is now certain that he can continue his plans to create a powerful Cobra Emperor named Serpentor unimpeded. Altering his scheme a bit, Mindbender is now determined to use Sgt. Slaughter's DNA in the creation process. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 4" first aired in America on September 18, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Three In the third chapter of a five-part adventure, the Joes run into danger in all corners of the world. Beach Head and Mainframe encounter trouble at Dracula's castles; Duke is jeopardized at Genghis Khan's tomb; Shipwreck is nearly scuttled at Alexander the Great's underwater crypt; and Sgt. Slaughter is captured near Sun Tzu's burial mound. On the "plus" side, the Joes finally discover that Cobra intends to use the DNA from past conquerors to create an omnipotent Cobra Emperor named Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 3" first aired in America on September 17, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part Two In the second chapter of a five-part adventure, the new G.I. Joe team scurries all over the world, trying to prevent Cobra from raiding the sacred resting places of such past leaders as Napoleon, Alexander the Great, and Ivan the Terrible. The heroes run into a great deal of interference, not only from Cobra but also from local politicians and bureaucrats. Meanwhile, Dr. Mindbender begins the process of assembling the new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor Serpentor. Written by Buzz Dixon, "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 2" first aired in America on September 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Part One Season two of G.I. Joe was launched in America on September 15, 1986, with the first episode of the five-part adventure |Arise, Serpentor, Arise. Fed up with Cobra Commander's bungling, Dr. Mindbender decides to create a new, all-powerful Cobra Emperor, using the DNA of such past conquerers as Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and Sun Tzu. It is up to the brand-new G.I. Joe team to stop Mindbender in his tracks, but first, they have to figure out exactly what he is up to. "Arise, Serpentor, Arise!, Pt. 1" was written by Buzz Dixon. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Spy That Rooked Me Also known as "The Spy Who Rooked Me," this episode focuses on a world-famous, Bond-like secret agent named Matthew Burke. After rescuing Joe team members Flint, Lady Jaye, Dial-Tone, and Cross-Country, Burke agrees to help them deliver some deadly nerve gas -- and, incidentally, to elude the diabolical Dr. Mindbender. Alas, Burke is so wrapped up in his own mistake that he nearly messes up the mission. Written with tongue firmly in cheek by Susan K. Williams, "The Spy That Rooked Me" originally aired in America on October 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Glamour Girls Desperately desiring eternal youth, Madame Veil relies upon the sinister resourcefulness of Cobra. The villains kidnap dozens of beautiful fashion models, intending to tap their youthfulness on behalf of Mme. Veil. The Joes go to the rescue, receiving unexpected help from one of the abducted models: Lowlight's own sister Una. Beth Bornstein's teleplay is more than a little beholden to the Georges Franju horror film Eyes Without a Face, especially near the end of the story. "Glamour Girls" made its American TV debut on October 8, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Cobrathon Cobra is in dire need of an expensive computer virus designed to cripple the records of law enforcement agencies throughout the world. But rather than pay for the device in the normal fashion, the villains choose to put on a pay-per-view telethon, staged in a hellish casino. In this perverse twist on the Jerry Lewis oeuvre, the telethon's "entertainment" includes the ritual torture of Joe members Sci-Fi and Lifeline. Written by Martin Pasko and Rebecca Parr, "Cobrathon" first aired in America on October 6, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Sink the Montana The unexpected catalyst for this episode is Admiral George Lattimer of the U.S. Navy. Unwilling to allow his beloved USS Montana to be scrapped, the admiral joins force with Cobra's Destro turns against the United States. The Joes must prevent Lattimer from using his obsolete but still-deadly battleship from destroying the entire Atlantic Fleet. Written by David Carren, "Sink the Montana" first aired in America on September 29, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Raise the Flagg! The Joes and the Cobras race against other to salvage the remains of the sunken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Flagg. The Joes get to the wreckage first, only to discover it is inhabited by a demented Cobra chef. In addition to deadly gastronomic efforts, the Joes must also contend with some BATs and an antimatter energy pod. Written by David Carren, "Raise the Flagg!" made its first American TV appearance on October 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Brother's Keeper Wheelchair-bound physicist Jeremy Penser allows himself to be duped by Cobra. In exchange for regaining the use of his legs, Dr. Penser agrees to help develop Cobra's latest weapon of destruction. So blindsided does Penser become that he nearly seals the doom of his own younger brother Timothy -- not to mention practically every member of the G.I. Joe team. Written by Buzz Dixon, "My Brother's Keeper" originally aired in America on October 15, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Iceberg Goes South Joe Team member Iceberg visits his girlfriend, Mahia, at her uncle's "Tropodome," a tropical biodome. Little does he suspect that Cobra's Dr. Mindbender is using the building as headquarters for his latest batch of diabolical genetic experiments. By the time the rest of the Joes show up, Iceberg has been converted into a hideous mutant. Written by Mary Skrenes, "Iceberg Goes South" first aired in America on October 9, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: The Rotten Egg Invited to be the guest of honor at a military academy, Leatherneck discovers that the institution is under the command of Cobra. Worse still, the head of the academy is a fugitive criminal named McCann -- who, as a raw Marine grunt, had been trained by Leatherneck at Parris Island. Seeking revenge for being booted from the service, Leatherneck is determined to use his own military strategy to destroy his former mentor. Written by Steve Mitchell and Barbara Petty, "The Rotten Egg" originally aired in America on October 7, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Million Dollar Medic LifeLine rescues Bree Van Mark, daughter of a wealthy industrialist, from a watery grave. To show her gratitude, Bree showers the reluctant LifeLine with expensive gifts -- including a gold-plated helicopter. Inevitably, the girl becomes a pawn in the latest Cobra scheme. Celebrated cartoon voice-over director Susan Blu is heard as Bree. Written by Carla and Gerry Conway, "Million Dollar Medic" first aired in America on October 2, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Once Upon a Joe... During a pitched battle between the Cobras and the Joes, an orphanage is accidentally destroyed, though the children emerge unscathed. As a new building is constructed, Shipwreck tries to keep the kids entertained, all the while endeavoring to prevent Zartan from recovering a lost Cobra weapon, the mysterious McGuffin Device (scriptwriter Buzz Dixon certainly knows his Hitchcock). The plot is partially resolved by orphan girl Jenny, who in many respects is quicker on the uptake than the Joes. "Once Upon a Joe..." originally aired in the U.S. on October 1, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Let's Play Soldier In Bangkok, Leatherneck takes charge of four "dust children," street orphans fathered by American GIs. Meanwhile, Cobra tries to enslave the population of Thailand by distributing chewing gum laced with Dr. Mindbender's latest mind-paralysis drug. As if that wasn't enough of a complication, the duplicitous Zarana leads the G.I. Joe team into another trap. Written by Sharman Di Vono, "Let's Play Soldier" first aired in the U.S. on September 30, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Computer Complications Cobra operative Zarana breaks into Joe headquarters, there to steal an antimatter deposit. Her plans are altered when she meets and falls in love with Joe team member Mainframes. Orders are orders, and Zarana has been ordered to kill Mainframe. David Schwartz's teleplay is chock-full of clever and unexpected plot twists. "Computer Complications" was first telecast in America on September 26, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Last Hour to Doomsday Cobra's latest weapon is the Vortex Cone, which plays havoc with the ocean's magnetic currents to cause huge tidal waves all over the world. Thus armed, the Cobra leader threatens to wipe out the entire East Coast if his demands are not meant. In their efforts to foil the villains, the Joe Teams deploys such strategies as having Lady Jaye impersonate the Baroness. Written by Tom Degenais, "Last Hour to Doomsday" originally aired in America on September 25, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: My Favorite Things Serpentor leads a band of Cobras in stealing the historical relics which, when assembled, form the DNA for Serpentor's personality matrix. The villains' problem: They must wrest these relics away from the even nastier despots who currently possess them. Meanwhile, Joe team member Wet-Suit learns a valuable lesson about self-control -- and nearly meets disaster in the castle of the original Count Dracula. Written by Doug Booth, "My Favorite Things" originally aired in America on October 16, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep Joe team member Cross Country stumbles upon a Cobra slave labor camp. The captives are toiling on behalf of Cobra Commander, who needs enough money to thwart Serpentor's latest power play. The story's "maguffin" is a missing computer disk, over which a lot of fuss is stirred. Some good "mutant" character design and animation distinguishes this episode, which was written by Buzz Dixon and Michael Charles Hill. "Into Your Tent I Will Silently Creep" was the final episode of G.I. Joe, though not the final one to be telecast: Its original American air date was November 20, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide G.I. Joe: Not a Ghost of a Chance Three Cobra members go on Hector Ramirez's TV show "Twenty Questions," ostensibly to clear themselves of charges that he destroyed the prototype for a new stealth bomber. Meanwhile, the Joes try to rescue the bombers' missing pilots. Their efforts -- and the ultimate unmasking of Cobra as the scoundrels that they really are -- is almost undermined by Joe team member Flint's personal demons. Written by Sharmon Di Vono, "Not a Ghost of a Chance" was first telecast in America on November 13, 1986. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Prisoner: The Complete Series

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Nov 10, 2009

    Includes:The Prisoner: The Arrival (1967) The Prisoner: The Schizoid Man (1967) The Prisoner: Many Happy Returns (1967) The Prisoner: Dance of the Dead (1967) The Prisoner: Hammer into the Anvil (1967) The Prisoner: A Change of Mind (1967) The Prisoner: Checkmate (1967) The Prisoner: It's Your Funeral (1967) The Prisoner: Profits from Poison (1967) The Prisoner: The General (1967) The Prisoner: Free for All (1967) The Prisoner: The Chimes of Big Ben (1967) The Prisoner: A, B & C (1967) The Prisoner: Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling (1968) The Prisoner: The Girl Who Was Death (1968) The Prisoner: Fallout (1968) The Prisoner: Once upon a Time (1968) The Prisoner: Living in Harmony (1968) The Prisoner: The Arrival Having been kidnapped and drugged after resigning his position, a British intelligence agent (Patrick McGoohan) awakens in the Village (a mysterious, Orwellian community). Now known as Number Six, he is expected to provide information to the enigmatic Number Two (Guy Doleman) if he ever hopes to escape the Village and return home. Things take an even more perplexing turn when Cobb (Paul Eddington), an old friend of Number Six, suddenly shows up...and just as suddenly kills himself. In one of her last appearances, (Virginia Maskell) guest-stars as "the Woman." "The Arrival" was co-written by series producer David Tomblin and George Markstein. This inaugural episode of The Prisoner first aired in England on October 1, 1967, and in America on June 1, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: The Schizoid Man Number Six awakens one morning to find that his appearance has been radically altered and that he has been reassigned the "identity" of Number Two. Compounding his confusion, he comes face to face with the new Number Six, who looks exactly like his "old" self (Patrick McGoohan plays both roles). It's all part of a scheme by the New Number Two (Anton Rodgers) to break down the protagonist's resistance --- and possibly, his sanity. Jane Merrow costars as Alison, a woman claiming to have a mental link with Number Six (but which one?) Written by Terence Feely, "The Schizoid Man" first aired in England on October 29, 1967, and in America on July 6, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Many Happy Returns Originally broadcast in England on November 12, 1967, this episode of The Prisoner was written by Anthony Skene and directed by "Joseph Serf" --- actually a pseudonym for series star Patrick McGoohan. Arising from his slumbers early one morning, Number Six discovers that the Village is deserted and all the power has been shut off. At last able to make his escape, Number Six fashions a raft and sets out to sea. Washing up on the shore of what seems to be a familiar English coastal village, he finds that his old lodgings have been taken over by a Mrs. Butterworth (Georgina Cookson), whose behavior does not set his heart at ease. Hoping to return to his former government headquarters to inform his superiors of the Village's existence, the prisoner is plunged into a deep and ever-widening pit of paranoia, with no certainty as to whom he can trust and whom he should fear. Donald Sinden and Patrick Cargill guest star as the Colonel and Thorpe, respectively. "Many Happy Returns" first aired in America on July 20, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Dance of the Dead In this episode of the allegorical television series The Prisoner, No. 6 (Patrick McGoohan) discovers a new sort of danger has come to the Village, while a carnival attempts to distract the villagers from their gloom. No. 6 recognizes a new resident, and learns that he is being tortured by No. 2 (Marn Morris) in order to learn the truth about No. 6 and his past. As both No. 6 and the newcomer are subjected to interrogation to find out what they know, a body washes up on the beach, which No. 6 discovers has a radio in his pocket. Will he be able to get the radio to work and find out what's happanmed in the outside world? And can he somehow send a signal to the people outside the Village about his plight? ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Hammer into the Anvil Written by Roger Woddis, this episode of The Prisoner guest stars Patrick Cargill (also seen in the previous episode "Free for All") as super sadistic New Number Two. Delighting in tormenting the villagers, Number Two drives at least one of them, Number 73 (Hilary Dwyer), to suicide. Hoping to avenge the woman's death, Number Six begins his own campaign of psychological warfare, utilizing such "weapons" as his collection of Bizet recordings! In addition to resembling an installment of the much later CBS series, Survivor, this episode also predates American Gladiators by offering an "extreme sport" known as Kosho. Originally slated as the 14th episode of The Prisoner, "Hammer into the Anvil" was seen as episode number 10 when it first aired in England on December 10, 1967. It was placed in its original chronology for American television, where it was first seen on August 31, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: A Change of Mind First broadcast in England on December 31, 1967, "A Change of Mind" was directed by Prisoner star Patrick McGoohan, under the pseudonym of "Joseph Serf" (the same name he'd used when directing the earlier episode "Many Happy Returns.") Still refusing to reveal his reasons for resigning from British Intelligence save for the vague explanation "I needed time to think," Number Six is declared "unmutual" by the powers that be in The Village. As such, he is subjected to the double assault of mind-bending drugs and ear-piercing sound waves. Though this treatment is meant to make Number Six more compliant, the tables are turned upon his tormentor Number Two (John Sharpe), with the unwitting assistance of Number Eighty Six (Angela Browne). Written by Roger Parkes and intended to be shown as the series' 13th episode, "A Change of Mind" was rescheduled as the 12th intallment--but not in America, where it aired in its proper chronological order on August 24, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Checkmate Originally written as the second episode of The Prisoner, "Checkmate" was then slated to be shown as episode #11. Instead, it was telecast out of chronological order as the 10th episode on December 3, 1967. One of the series' most fondly remembered installments ---and the one that posted the highest ratings when first broadcast in England --- this exercise in surrealism takes place on a giant chess board, wherein all the "pieces" are people. One of the participants is Number Six, who cannot determine if the other players are making moves of their own free will, or if they are being manipulated by a unseen force. Crucial players in this bizarre game are an icy psychiatrist (Patricia Jessel) and the (apparently) independently minded Queen (Rosalie Crutchley). As originally written by Gerald Kelsey), the script for "Checkmate" came up seven minutes short, compelling series star Patrick McGoohan to hastily compose an extra scene. The episode was restored to its proper Prisoner chronology when it was first shown in America on August 17, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: It's Your Funeral Number Six learns of an impending assassination, "Plan Division Q," in which the target is the Retiring Number Two (Andre Van Gyseghem). Actually, these plans were deliberately divulged by the New Number Two (Derren Nesbitt), who hopes thereby to discredit Number Six. With no one willing to believe that an assassination is about to take place, Number Six finds that his fate may rest in the hands of a watchmaker (Martin Miller) and his daughter (Annette Andre). Written by Michael Cramoy, "It's Your Funeral" was supposed to have been the 10th episode of The Prisoner, but instead was telecast in England as episode number 11 on December 17, 1967. Its original chronology was restored when it debuted in America on August 10, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Profits from Poison No synopsis available. The Prisoner: The General The fine line between knowledge and insight becomes a battleground in this episode of the classic British television series The Prisoner. Number Six (Patrick McGoohan) becomes aware of a strange new innovation created by scientists in the Village -- a type of brain implant that allows the subject to readily absorb information, but eliminates their ability to process their own thoughts. The role of Number Two is played in this episode by Colin Gordon, with Betty McDowell and John Castle heading up the supporting players. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Free for All The celebrated "election episode" of The Prisoner, "Free For All" was directed by series star Patrick McGoohan, and also written by him under the pen name of Paddy Fitz. While the Village gears up for the election of the New Number Two, Number Six is encouraged to throw his hat in the ring. Curiously, Number Six is nominated by the incumbent, Number Two (Eric Portman) himself. At first balking at the "honor", Number Six is persuaded to run on the promise that, if elected, he will learn the identity of Number One --- thereby earning his freedom. Rachel Herbert plays the crucial role of maidservant Number Fifty Eight. "Free For All" made its British TV bow on October 22, 1967, and was first telecast in America on June 29, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: The Chimes of Big Ben In this episode of the cult-favorite TV series The Prisoner, Number 6 (Patrick McGoohan) appears to be developing an artistic side when he begins work on a series of sculptures for an art exhibit. What his captors do not realize is that they can be assembled into a boat, and Number 6 uses them to sail away from the Village. In time, Number Six reaches England, where he returns to the offices of the espionage organization from which he attempted to resign, only to discover he's fallen into a trap. Leo McKern plays Village leader Number Two in this episode, while Finlay Currie and Nadia Gray highlight the supporting cast. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: A, B & C In this episode of the British television series The Prisoner, medical researchers at the Village have discovered a way to tap into the human mind and observe a person's dreams and sub-conscious thoughts. Number Six (Patrick McGoohan) becomes a test subject, and as he is unconscious, his imaginings are adjusted until he believes he's in Paris on a rendezvous to sell the secrets he learned as an espionage agent. Number Two, the leader of the mysterious Village, is played in this episode by Colin Gordon; Katherine Kath and Sheila Allen also appear. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling Regarded by many as the best-ever episode of The Prisoner, "Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling" was written by Vincent Tilsley. Number Six awakens with the belief that he is actually another man -- to be exact, an Army colonel (Nigel Stock). Failing to recognize his own face in his own mirror, the confused protagonist also learns that "The Colonel" has been missing for a full year. The answer to the mystery rests in the hands of one Professor Seltzman (Hugh Schuster), the inventor of an insidious intellect-transfer machine. Clues essential to the action include a reference to Number Six's former fiancée, and an inventory of the former intelligence agent's code names. Also appearing are Zena Walker as Janet and Clifford Evans as the new Number Two. As originally conceived, "Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling" was supposed to have been the series' ninth episode, but instead was rescheduled as episode 13 on British television, making its first appearance on January 7, 1968. When The Prisoner was rebroadcast in America on CBS, the intended episode chronology was restored, and "Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling" was properly shown right after episode number eight ("Dance of the Dead") on August 3, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: The Girl Who Was Death First broadcast in England on January 21, 1968, "The Girl Who Was Death" was written by Terence Feely, from an idea by David Tomblin, producer of The Prisoner and director of this episode. Again mysteriously transported from The Village, Number Six finds himself in an isolated lighthouse with a girl named Sonia (Justine Lord) who by some fluke of fate has apparently caused the deaths of at least three men. Referring to herself as "Death", Sonia insists that she and Number Six are made for each other, inasmuch as he has survived so many previous attempts on his life. As the story progresses, it becomes painfully obvious that the so-called lighthouse is actually a nuclear missile, designed by Sonia's demented father (Kenneth Griffith) to destroy London. Originally intended as a two-part episode, "The Girl Who Was Death" was diminished to a single installment because of star Patrick McGoohan's commitment to the theatrical feature Ice Station Zebra; in fact, McGoohan is absent from much of the proceedings, requiring the producers to use doubles and stock shots for certain linking scenes. The episode made its American TV debut on September 7, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Fallout Perhaps one of the most fascinating and maddening 48 minutes ever committed to television broadcast, "Fall Out" was the 17th and final episode of the British sci-fi/fantasy series The Prisoner. Having survived the ordeal of Degree Absolute in the previous episode "Once Upon a Time", Number Six is rewarded with the right to become an individual once more. With the begrudging blessing of the defeated Number Two (Leo McKern), Number Six is given back his original clothes, the key to his old house, a million pounds' worth of travellers cheques, and an international passport. But this is not enough for Number Six: He insists upon learning the identity of the enigmatic Number One, who was responsible for his ordeal in The Village. From this point on, the episode's already pervasive surrealism reaches a fever pitch, festooned with cryptic messages, verbal and visual puns, "reunions" with past antagonists, Beatles tunes in the background, and various "types" wandering around in white masks. One of these masked figures is the elusive Number One. . .and that's all that can be said without giving the game away (if indeed, the game could ever be given away). Written and directed by series star Patrick McGoohan, "Fall Out" was originally telecast in England on February 4, 1968, and in America on September 21, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Once upon a Time Written and directed by series star Patrick McGoohan, "Once Upon a Time" was the first of two episodes of The Prisoner designed to "explain" (more or less) several of the questions posed by the previous episodes, and to bring the saga to a conclusion --- albeit not a logical one. Leo McKern costars as the Previous Number Two, who had supposedly been dispensed with in the earlier episode "Chimes of Big Ben." Returning to the village for one last desperate attempt to "break" Number Six, Number Two utilizes a sinister mind-probing process called Degree Absolute (which was also this episode's original title). Forced to relive all the events of his life, Number Six is plunged into a bizarre netherworld where reality is not even a concept. This time around, the stakes are extremely high, with the lives of both Number Two and Number Six hanging in the balance. When The Prisoner was originally planned as a two-season series, "Once Upon a Time" was supposed to have been the 13th and final episode of Season One. But upon rethinking the series in terms of a single 17-episode season, the script was refashioned as the next-to-last episode; as such, it first aired in England on January 28, 1968, and in America on September 14, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Prisoner: Living in Harmony Written by David Tomblin and Ian L. Rakoff, "Living In Harmony" briefly whisks Number Six away from The Village and plunks him into the American West circa 1870. Forced by a "Roy Bean"-style judge (David Bauer) to accept the job of sheriff, Number Six discovers that his first assignment is to protect to beautiful Cathy (Valerie French) from a vicious outlaw known as The Kid (Alexis Kanner). This places the protagonist in an uncomfortable position: How can he fulfill his new responsibility while keeping his self-promise to never again use a gun? Harmony, by the way, is the name of the town where all this takes place --- or does it? Originally slated as Episode 12 of The Prisoner, "Living In Harmony" was seen as the series' 14th installment when it originally aired in England on January 14, 1968. Curiously, this episode was not shown in America where The Prisoner was first networkcast in the summer of 1968 (reportedly, it contained too much violence --- or, possibly, too much of the leading lady's cleavage), though it was included in the Prisoner package syndicated in the US in the fall of 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Becker: Season 1-3

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Jan 12, 2010

    Includes:Becker: Pilot (1998) Becker: Take These Pills and Shove 'Em (1998) Becker: Sex in the Inner City (1998) Becker: My Dinner With Becker (1998) Becker: City Lights (1998) Becker: Man Plans, God Laughs (1998) Becker: Tell Me Lies (1998) Becker: Saving Henry Cohen (1999) Becker: Lucky Day (1999) Becker: Regarding Reggie (1999) Becker: Drive, They Said (1999) Becker: Cyrano De-Beckerac (1999) Becker: Linda Quits (1999) Becker: He Said, She Said (1999) Becker: Stumble in the Bronx (1999) Becker: Hate Thy Neighbor (1999) Becker: Pain in the Aspirin (1999) Becker: Blind Curve (1999) Becker: Santa on Ice (1999) Becker: Scriptus Interruptus (1999) Becker: Choose Me (1999) Becker: Physician, Heal Thyself (1999) Becker: Partial Law (1999) Becker: Activate Your Choices (1999) Becker: Limits and Boundaries (1999) Becker: Larry Spoke (1999) Becker: Becker the Elder (1999) Becker: P.C. World (1999) Becker: My Boyfriend's Back (1999) Becker: Shovel Off to Buffalo (1999) Becker: Point of Contact (1999) Becker: Imm-oral Fixations (1999) Becker: Love! Lies! Bleeding! (1999) Becker: Truth and Consequences (1999) Becker: The Roast That Ruined Them (2000) Becker: Old Yeller (2000) Becker: All the Rage (2000) Becker: The Film Critic (2000) Becker: SuperBob (2000) Becker: Panic on the 86th Floor (2000) Becker: For Whom the Toll Calls (2000) Becker: The Bearer of Bad Tidings (2000) Becker: One Angry Man (2000) Becker: Sight Unseen (2000) Becker: Crosstalk (2000) Becker: Cooked (2000) Becker: The Rumor (2000) Becker: Beckerethics (2000) Becker: Smoke 'Em If You Got 'Em (2000) Becker: Dr. Angry Head (2000) Becker: Margaret's Dream (2000) Becker: One Wong Move (2000) Becker: What Indifference a Day Makes (2000) Becker: The Usual Suspects (2000) Becker: The Wrong Man (2000) Becker: The Hypocritic Oath (2000) Becker: 2001 1/2: A Graduation Odyssey (2001) Becker: The More You Know (2001) Becker: The Ugly Truth (2001) Becker: Elder Hostile (2001) Becker: You Say Gay Son, I Say Godson (2001) Becker: Nocturnal Omissions (2001) Becker: The Tor-Mentor (2001) Becker: Sue You (2001) Becker: Heart Breaker (2001) Becker: The Trouble with Harry (2001) Becker: The Princess Cruise (2001) Becker: Pretty Poison (2001) Becker: Small Wonder (2001) Becker: Trials and Defibrillations (2001) Becker: Pilot Cheers star Ted Danson returns to the small screen to portray an extremely gifted but outwardly gruff Bronx physician who frequently alienates those around him yet possesses an enormous passion to help his ailing patients. As the series gets underway, Becker does his best to treat an HIV-positive child and learns that his favorite diner has a new owner. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Take These Pills and Shove 'Em Becker's harsh bedside manner has caused a critical patient, Mr. Marino, to leave the hospital and return home. Now, in order to save Mr. Marino's life, Becker must make a rare house call and convince the ailing man that his diabetes has triggered a minor heart attack. But Mr. Marino is skeptical of the diagnosis, and suspects that the combative medico is operating by a secret set of ulterior motives. Meanwhile, Becker's friend Jake - the blind owner of the local newsstand - has enrolled in a sculpting class in hopes of meeting women. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Sex in the Inner City Sex seems to be the running thread throughout the day as Becker is drawn into a steamy conversation between Reggie and Jake during breakfast at the diner, and becomes acutely aware of his lackluster sex life when his patients and coworkers repeatedly bring up the topic. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: My Dinner With Becker Becker has been approached with the prospect of a blind date, and while he hesitates to accept after discovering that the woman in question loves line-dancing, aroma therapy, and karaoke, he ultimately agrees to give it a shot. But by the time he realizes that he should have trusted his instincts, it's already too late. Meanwhile, Reggie has had enough of nice guys, and drops her latest love interest after he proves much to accepting and accommodating. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: City Lights A flickering streetlight is shining directly into Becker's window, preventing the crabby medico from getting a good night's sleep. But the city has refused to address the issue in a timely manner, leaving a sleepless Becker to resolve the issue personally. Meanwhile, Margaret begins to regret her decision to permit Linda one personal item in the office after discovering that Linda's item has a life of its own. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Man Plans, God Laughs As the terminally abrasive Becker discovers that he just might not be cut out for friendship, Linda has taken charge of the office due to the fact that Margaret is hold up at home with the flu. Meanwhile, Reggie experiences an unwanted reunion with a former high-school classmate. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Tell Me Lies Reggie is obviously upset about something, but refuses to tell Jake and Becker what's bothering her. When Becker persists in his efforts to discover the source of Reggie's malaise, she constructs an impenetrable wall of lies before ultimately breaking down and telling the truth. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Saving Henry Cohen An ally cat has taken up residence in Becker's office and refuses to budge. Despite being determined to do everything within his power to rid himself of the pesky feline, however, the contentious doctor soon discovers that his newfound friend has some rather serious health issues. Begrudgingly opening his wallet to help the animal make a recovery, Becker enlists Margaret's assistance in planning a trip that he'll likely never take. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Lucky Day Today seems to be Becker's lucky day: Not only does he find a prime parking spot, but he receives a surprise tax refund and has an unusually quick trip to the post-office as well. But with each new stoke of luck comes the unmistakable suspicion that something wretched is about to befall him. Later, after finally allowing himself to appreciate his good fortune, Becker takes a serious tumble. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Regarding Reggie The medical fundraiser is fast approaching and Becker still hasn't found a date for the big night - but who to ask? Fearing that Reggie will mistake a friendly invitation for a romantic overture, Becker does his best to find someone else to take to the fundraiser. Despite his best efforts at finding another date, however, it always comes back to Reggie. As the pressure mounts for Becker to get over his unfounded fear and simply ask Reggie to join him, the stressed-out doctor finds his memories drifting back to the time when, as a ten year-old boy eager to find a date to the dance, he experienced his first bout with rejection. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Drive, They Said Becker becomes obligated to play taxi driver when Reggie, Margaret, Jake, and Linda realize that he's headed for Queens, and ask if he can drop them off at various locations along the way. Had any of these people ever actually ridden in a car that Becker was driving, however, odds are good that they would have simply taken the subway. After Becker causes an accident with his hyper-aggressive driving skills, he returns to his office to discover that his waiting room is overflowing with patients. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Cyrano De-Beckerac Reggie tells Becker he doesn't know anything about women, but unbeknownst to her, Becker is giving dating tips to her new beau (Robert Gant). Meanwhile, Linda becomes a big sister to an obnoxious teen (Molly Morgan). ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Linda Quits Linda quits her job after she makes a mistake on a patient's prescription, and Becker hires what seems like an ideal replacement. Meanwhile, Reggie, Jake and Bob wonder why a nicely dressed man keeps pacing back and forth outside the diner. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: He Said, She Said John isn't too pleased when a friend (Julie Caitlin Brown) of a friend looks him up, but he changes his tune when he sees her and he realizes that she accepts him just as he is. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Stumble in the Bronx John gets a taste of his own medicine when he is accidentally shot and has to put up with obnoxious doctors and nurses at a hospital. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Hate Thy Neighbor Becker is released from the hospital and is surprised---and pleased---when his attractive doctor (Frances Fisher) makes a house call that is strictly personal. Meanwhile, Margaret tries to find a suitable physician to temporarily replace Becker. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Pain in the Aspirin John thinks Liz (Frances Fisher) is lying when she claims she doesn't have any aspirin, even though he knows she has some---because he went through her purse. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Blind Curve Jake's old friend (Cress Williams), who was responsible for the car accident in which Jake lost his sight, pays him a surprise visit. Meanwhile, Margaret tries to get out of an annual road trip with some nursing school friends. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Santa on Ice Becker is his usual bitter self as Christmas rolls around, until a department-store Santa drops dead in his waiting room. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Scriptus Interruptus Having recently agreed to peen an article for a colleague's medical journal, Becker is disturbed to discover that he seems to be suffering from writer's block. The deadline is fast approaching, and he can't seem to find a place to write in peace. If Becker could only find five minutes to sit down and think through the article, perhaps he could summon the inspiration needed to finish it. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Choose Me Reggie has an extra ticket to the upcoming hockey game between the New York Rangers and the Philadelphia Flyers. Upon announcing this to the crew, Jake and Becker enter into a heated competition to become the chosen recipient of the coveted ticket. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Physician, Heal Thyself The irascible Becker receives a taste of his own bitter medicine when his back suddenly gives out and he is forced to reach out to Reggie for help. Having recently entered into a heated debate with the outspoken restaurateur, the prospect of asking for her assistance proves especially humbling for the arrogant Bronx medico. Incensed at Reggie's recommendation that he visit an acupuncturist, Becker begins to reconsider when he is left lying on his apartment floor. Later, Margaret discovers that she has a not-so-secret admirer in the form of her love-struck postman. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Partial Law Becker's computer has been stolen from his apartment, and upon learning that his insurance payout won't even cover the cost of a new keyboard he decides to procure a new machine on the cheap. But, as the frustrated medico is about to find out, there are some things that are worth doing right - even if it does mean spending a little extra cash. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Activate Your Choices Becker's ex-wife Sandra is in town for a stop on her book-signing tour, and while the temperamental medico does his best to appear disinterested in the announcement, his attention is peaked upon discovering that a few chapters in Sandra's best-selling self-help book deal with a man she refers to as "Angry Man." As a couple, Becker and Sandra always possessed an explosive chemistry, and when he confronts her over the similarities between himself and "Angry Man" is becomes readily apparent that chemistry is still well in tact. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Limits and Boundaries A patient's mother is in desperate need of someone to look after her two children for the day, and try as he might Becker just can't turn the woman down. Though he reluctantly agrees to play babysitter for the day, he swiftly pawns the children off to Margaret and Linda. Later, when a few hours of watching the kids turns into an all-night sleepover, Becker discovers just how difficult it can be to establish rules with such willful youngsters. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Larry Spoke As Becker attempts to contend with a patient who claims he can speak directly to God, Linda wrestles with whether or not to return a rather spiffy jacket that was mistakenly given to her by her drycleaner. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Becker the Elder Becker's estranged father Fred has dropped in for an unannounced visit, charming the hospital staff and irritating his tempestuous son. In contrast to his uptight son, Fred is a laid-back and jovial old man who gets along quite easily with others. And though Becker seems to want nothing to do with his outwardly amicable dad, Fred is determined to put aside their differences and reconnect. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: P.C. World When a local reporter eavesdrops on an argument between Dr. Becker and a man at the diner, he seems the outspoken medico's comments politically incorrect and pens a scathing article condemning such outbursts. Though Dr. Becker does his best to let the situation simply play itself out, the self-serving reporter crosses the line when he appears on a local talk-radio show and continues his tirade. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: My Boyfriend's Back Reggie goes out with an old flame (Larry Poindexter) who is building a hospital in the area. Meanwhile, John fumes over his former research partner's patent for anti-wrinkle cream ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Shovel Off to Buffalo John accidentally receives two plane tickets to Chicago when he agrees to speak at a conference, so he takes Reggie with him. Meanwhile, Bob takes over as cook at the diner in Reggie's absence. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Point of Contact Becker saves a woman (Kim Darby) from choking and then fears for his life when he takes her continual gratitude for stalking. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Imm-oral Fixations Becker is grumpier than usual after he decides to quit smoking, but he gets a lift from Reggie's friend (Marjorie Monaghan), an ex-smoker who tells him the only substitute that worked for her was sex. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Love! Lies! Bleeding! Valentine's Day is fast approaching, and Becker's doubts about the existence of true love only seem to be confirmed when he treats a man whose wife has stabbed him with a fork, contends with a teen intent on getting a vasectomy, attempts to treat a woman with severe allergies to roses, and witnesses Linda terminate a relationship all within the span of one day. Later that night, a surprising hospital visit causes the cynical doctor to soften his stance on the issue and begin to understand what Valentine's Day means to couples who are truly, deeply in love. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: Truth and Consequences Accepting an invitation to his cousin Barry's house for dinner, Becker quickly realizes that Barry and his wife are experiencing some serious marital problems. When Becker accidentally lets it slip that Barry once had an affair, an already awkward dinner becomes downright tense. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Becker: The Roast That Ruined Them Liz wants to throw a party and John reluctantly agrees to host it, but they have trouble finding anyone who wants to attend a party at John's place. Meanwhile, Reggie fears that her new boyfriend from college is too young for her. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Old Yeller John buys a motorcycle in a vain attempt to recapture his youth, after some people make comments suggesting that he's getting old. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: All the Rage A judge sentences John to attend an anger-management class after he insults two police officers. Meanwhile, Linda invites Bob to move in with her---much to everyone else's dismay. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: The Film Critic No synopsis available. Becker: SuperBob No synopsis available. Becker: Panic on the 86th Floor Reggie's celebration after earning an A in her psychology class turns to panic when she considers her uncertain future; and John entertains one of his neighbors, who turns out to be a hooker. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: For Whom the Toll Calls John is determined to have the phone company remove a long-distance charge on his bill that he claims shouldn't be there; Reggie is upset when she isn't invited to a friend's wedding; Bob listens to motivational tapes in order to land a job. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: The Bearer of Bad Tidings John agrees to take on a vacationing doctor's patients and one of them dies. Meanwhile, Linda tries to comfort a friend (M. Darlene Hunt) who won't leave the office, and Reggie and Jake trade barbs during a slow time in the diner. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: One Angry Man John fumes when he can't get out of jury duty and then can't get picked to actually serve on a jury; Jake gets a dog. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Sight Unseen Jake asks out a friendly young woman (Heidi Mokrycki), only to break up with her after he learns that she's also blind; Margaret tries to discover why a grouchy patient likes everyone but her. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Crosstalk John gets into an argument with a priest (John Mahoney) over whose hands a patient is really in---God's or the doctor's; Reggie, Jake and Bob take a gamble on the stock market. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Cooked Liz is offered a job in Chicago, which prompts John to tell her how he feels about her. He quickly regrets doing it, fearing he'll lose his freedom. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: The Rumor A rumor starts that John is dying when he suddenly begins eating healthy food and tries to control his temper. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: Beckerethics No synopsis available. Becker: Smoke 'Em If You Got 'Em No synopsis available. Becker: Dr. Angry Head No synopsis available. Becker: Margaret's Dream No synopsis available. Becker: One Wong Move No synopsis available. Becker: What Indifference a Day Makes No synopsis available. Becker: The Usual Suspects No synopsis available. Becker: The Wrong Man No synopsis available. Becker: The Hypocritic Oath John's waiting room turns into a maze of boxes when Linda orders too many supplies; Reggie becomes attracted to a much younger student and Margaret learns that a former patient died and has included her in her will. ~ Tim Holland, All Movie Guide Becker: 2001 1/2: A Graduation Odyssey No synopsis available. Becker: The More You Know No synopsis available. Becker: The Ugly Truth No synopsis available. Becker: Elder Hostile No synopsis available. Becker: You Say Gay Son, I Say Godson No synopsis available. Becker: Nocturnal Omissions No synopsis available. Becker: The Tor-Mentor No synopsis available. Becker: Sue You No synopsis available. Becker: Heart Breaker No synopsis available. Becker: The Trouble with Harry No synopsis available. Becker: The Princess Cruise No synopsis available. Becker: Pretty Poison No synopsis available. Becker: Small Wonder No synopsis available. Becker: Trials and Defibrillations No synopsis available.
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