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  • Rudo y Cursi - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Aug 25, 2009

    Carlos Cuarón, who co-wrote the script for his brother Alfonso Cuarón's breakthrough hit, Y Tu Mamá También, makes his feature directorial debut with Rudo y Cursi. The film also reunites the stars of the earlier film, Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna, and is the first release from the production company Alfonso started with Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro González Iñárritu, Cha Cha Chá. Rudo y Cursi depicts the changing relationship between two brothers who become soccer stars. Beto (Luna), the goaltender, is nicknamed "Rudo" because of his hard-nosed style of play, while Tato (Bernal), a forward, gets the nickname "Cursi" for his flamboyant goal celebrations and his flashy lifestyle. They both start out picking bananas in remote Tlachatlán, where they share a devotion to their mother. Then Batuta (Argentinean comic Guillermo Francella), a charmingly shiftless professional scout, happens by. He can only sign one of the brothers, so they battle it out on the pitch to see who gets his break. Instead of throwing the match to his brother as plan, Tato scores a goal and is on his way to stardom. He's more interested in becoming a pop star than a soccer star, but when he meets Maya (Jessica Mas), a famous TV hostess he's dreamed about for years, he begins to enjoy the trappings of fame. Meanwhile, resentful Beto waits for his chance. When he finally gets his break, he leaves his disapproving wife, Toña (Adriana Paz), and his kids to sneak off to Mexico City. The brothers' fortunes rise and fall, with Tato distracted by a demanding girlfriend and a hopeless singing career, while Beto deals with marital strife and a serious gambling problem. Rudo y Cursi had its New York Premiere at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide
  • Rudo y Cursi - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Aug 25, 2009

    Carlos Cuarón, who co-wrote the script for his brother Alfonso Cuarón's breakthrough hit, Y Tu Mamá También, makes his feature directorial debut with Rudo y Cursi. The film also reunites the stars of the earlier film, Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna, and is the first release from the production company Alfonso started with Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro González Iñárritu, Cha Cha Chá. Rudo y Cursi depicts the changing relationship between two brothers who become soccer stars. Beto (Luna), the goaltender, is nicknamed "Rudo" because of his hard-nosed style of play, while Tato (Bernal), a forward, gets the nickname "Cursi" for his flamboyant goal celebrations and his flashy lifestyle. They both start out picking bananas in remote Tlachatlán, where they share a devotion to their mother. Then Batuta (Argentinean comic Guillermo Francella), a charmingly shiftless professional scout, happens by. He can only sign one of the brothers, so they battle it out on the pitch to see who gets his break. Instead of throwing the match to his brother as plan, Tato scores a goal and is on his way to stardom. He's more interested in becoming a pop star than a soccer star, but when he meets Maya (Jessica Mas), a famous TV hostess he's dreamed about for years, he begins to enjoy the trappings of fame. Meanwhile, resentful Beto waits for his chance. When he finally gets his break, he leaves his disapproving wife, Toña (Adriana Paz), and his kids to sneak off to Mexico City. The brothers' fortunes rise and fall, with Tato distracted by a demanding girlfriend and a hopeless singing career, while Beto deals with marital strife and a serious gambling problem. Rudo y Cursi had its New York Premiere at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide
  • Sunshine Cleaning - Blu-ray Disc

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Aug 25, 2009

    A thirtysomething single mother whose boundless potential was squandered through a series of failed relationships and a misguided effort to help her younger sister succeed in life finds the fruits of her labors finally coming together in director Christine Jeffs' dark family comedy. Back in high school, the future looked pretty bright for Rose Lorkowski (Amy Adams); not only was she the cheerleading captain, but she was also dating the star quarterback. Flash forward a little over a decade, and Rose is working overtime in hopes of getting her son into a better school. Her sister, Norah (Emily Blunt), is still living at home with their father, Joe (Alan Arkin), a failed salesman whose penchant for jumping into get-rich-quick schemes has left the family without a financial net to fall back on. Rose may be down, but she certainly isn't out, and when she hatches a plan to launch a crime-scene cleanup business, the money starts rolling in. Sure, cleaning up murder scenes and suicide sites may not be the most glamorous job in the world, but death is a fairly profitable business, and as the phone keeps ringing, Rose and Norah finally begin to experience the closeness of sisterhood that has eluded them all these years while also providing their family with true security. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Sunshine Cleaning - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Aug 25, 2009

    A thirtysomething single mother whose boundless potential was squandered through a series of failed relationships and a misguided effort to help her younger sister succeed in life finds the fruits of her labors finally coming together in director Christine Jeffs' dark family comedy. Back in high school, the future looked pretty bright for Rose Lorkowski (Amy Adams); not only was she the cheerleading captain, but she was also dating the star quarterback. Flash forward a little over a decade, and Rose is working overtime in hopes of getting her son into a better school. Her sister, Norah (Emily Blunt), is still living at home with their father, Joe (Alan Arkin), a failed salesman whose penchant for jumping into get-rich-quick schemes has left the family without a financial net to fall back on. Rose may be down, but she certainly isn't out, and when she hatches a plan to launch a crime-scene cleanup business, the money starts rolling in. Sure, cleaning up murder scenes and suicide sites may not be the most glamorous job in the world, but death is a fairly profitable business, and as the phone keeps ringing, Rose and Norah finally begin to experience the closeness of sisterhood that has eluded them all these years while also providing their family with true security. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
  • Blacula/Scream, Blacula, Scream!

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes:Blacula (1972) Scream, Blacula, Scream! (1973), MPAA Rating: PG Blacula Advertised as the 100th production of American International studios, Blacula stars actor/singer William Marshall in the title role. An 18th century African prince, Blacula is transmogrified into a vampire while visiting Transylvania. Two centuries later, he rises from his coffin to wreak havoc in the Watts district of Los Angeles. Blacula's particular target is Tina (Vonetta McGee), whom he thinks is the reincarnation of his long-ago lady love. Thalmus Rasulala assumes the "Van Helsing" role as the vampire hunter who can't convince the authorities to cooperate. Yes, that is the same William Marshall who later played "The King of Cartoons" on TV's Pee-wee's Playhouse. A sequel, Scream, Blacula, Scream!, appeared not long after. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Scream, Blacula, Scream! In this horror sequel from the director of Count Yorga, Vampire, a member of an American voodoo cult revives the fanged Prince Manuwalde (William Marshall), only to become his slave. Manuwalde then puts the bite on various victims, but finds himself fixating on pretty Lisa (Pam Grier), a voodoo princess whom he believes can finally put his soul to rest. Lynne Moody, Nicholas Worth, and Bernie Hamilton are among the familiar cast, but the various occult trappings seem somewhat out of place in the modern Los Angeles setting and the production values are pretty shabby. Blaxploitation and camp fans should still find it mildly amusing, however, and Shakespearean actor Marshall is a lot of fun as the obsessive vampire. ~ Robert Firsching, All Movie Guide
  • TCM Greatest Films - Murder Mysteries

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes - The Maltese Falcon (1941), MPAA Rating: NR The Big Sleep (1946), MPAA Rating: NR The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), MPAA Rating: NR Dial M for Murder (1954) The Maltese Falcon After two previous film versions of Dashiell Hammett's detective classic The Maltese Falcon, Warner Bros. finally got it right in 1941--or, rather, John Huston, a long-established screenwriter making his directorial debut, got it right, simply by adhering as closely as possible to the original. Taking over from a recalcitrant George Raft, Humphrey Bogart achieved true stardom as Sam Spade, a hard-boiled San Francisco private eye who can be as unscrupulous as the next guy but also adheres to his own personal code of honor. Into the offices of the Spade & Archer detective agency sweeps a Miss Wonderly (Mary Astor), who offers a large retainer to Sam and his partner Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) if they'll protect her from someone named Floyd Thursby. The detectives believe neither Miss Wonderly nor her story, but they believe her money. Since Archer saw her first, he takes the case -- and later that evening he is shot to death, as is the mysterious Thursby. Miss Wonderly's real name turns out to be Brigid O'Shaughnessey, and, as the story continues, Sam is also introduced to the effeminate Joel Cairo (Peter Lorre) and the fat, erudite Kasper Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet, in his film debut). It turns out that Brigid, Cairo and Gutman are all international scoundrels, all involved in the search for a foot-high, jewel-encrusted statuette in the shape of a falcon. Though both Cairo and Gutman offer Spade small fortunes to find the "black bird," they are obviously willing to commit mayhem and murder towards that goal: Gutman, for example, drugs Spade and allows his "gunsel" Wilmer (Elisha Cook Jr.) to kick and beat the unconscious detective. This classic film noir detective yarn gets better with each viewing, which is more than can be said for the first two Maltese Falcons and the ill-advised 1975 "sequel" The Black Bird. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Big Sleep The definitive Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall vehicle, The Big Sleep casts Bogart as Raymond Chandler's cynical private eye Philip Marlowe. Summoned to the home of the fabulously wealthy General Sternwood (Charles Waldron), Marlowe is hired to deal with a blackmailer shaking down the General's sensuous, thumb-sucking daughter Carmen (Martha Vickers). This earns Marlowe the displeasure of Carmen's sloe-eyed, seemingly straight-laced older sister Vivian (Bacall), who is fiercely protective of her somewhat addled sibling. As he pursues the case at hand, Marlowe gets mixed up in the murder of Arthur Geiger (Theodore von Eltz), a dealer in pornography. He also runs afoul of gambling-house proprietor Eddie Mars (John Ridgely), who seems to have some sort of hold over the enigmatic Vivian. Any further attempts to outline the plot would be futile: the storyline becomes so complicated and convoluted that even screenwriters William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, and Jules Furthmann were forced to consult Raymond Chandler for advice (he was as confused by the plot as the screenwriters). When originally prepared for release in 1945, The Big Sleep featured a long exposition scene featuring police detective Bernie Ohls (Regis Toomey) explaining the more obscure plot details. This expository scene was ultimately sacrificed, along with several others, in favor of building up Bacall's part; for instance, a climactic sequence was reshot to emphasize sexual electricity between Bogart and Bacall, obliging Warners to replace a supporting player who'd gone on to another project. The end result was one of the most famously baffling film noirs but also one of the most successful in sheer star power. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Postman Always Rings Twice James M. Cain's novel received its first authorized screen treatment in this MGM production. Drifter Frank Chambers (John Garfield) takes a job at a ro
  • Transformers - More Than Meets the Eye - DVD

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 1, 2009

    Includes - The Transformers: Roll for It (1984) The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 3 (1984) The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 1 (1984) The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 2 (1984) The Transformers: Transport to Oblivion (1984) The Transformers: Roll for It This Transformers episode served to introduce the character of Chip Chase, a wheelchair-bound computer genius and one of the Autobots' best friends on Earth. The main plot finds Starscream in temporary charge of the Decepticons in Megatron's absence. The villains are desirous of getting their hands on a precious antimatter formula, which happens to be in Chip's possession. First telecast in the U.S. on October 13, 1984, "Roll for It" was written by George Arthur Bloom. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 3 Originally seen in America on September 19, 1984, the third and final chapter of "More Than Meets the Eye" begins as Bumblebee and Sparkplug are saved from the trapped Decepticons -- who, unfortunately, are also able to make their escape from the mine. An attempt to defeat the Decepticons at a holographic rocket base is thwarted when Megatron tumbles to the scheme. But this does not mean that the Decepticons will able to return to Cybertron and achieve final victory. "More Than Meets the Eye" was written by George Arthur Bloom. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 1 Transformers began its original syndicated run on September 17, 1984, with the three-part "origins" episode, "More Than Meets the Eye." In part one, the two warring Transformer armies, the Autobots and the Decepticons, crash-land on a prehistoric Earth. Four million years later in 2005 A.D., they are reactivated by a volcano. Resuming their centuries-long battle as if nothing had happened, both armies square off at an oil rig manned by earthlings Spike and Sparkplug. "More Than Meets the Eye" was written by George Arthur Bloom. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Part 2 In part two of the inaugural Transformers adventure "More Than Meets the Eye," the Autobots rescue Earthlings Spike and Sparkplug from the Decepticon, whereupon the two humans join the cause of the "good" Transformers. Meanwhile, the Decepticons endeavor to gut Earth of its resources in order to create precious energon cubes, which will enable the villains to take over not only Cybertron but the rest of the Universe. Things take a potentially disastrous turn when Optimus Prime is seriously injured while again attempting to save the humans. Written by George Arthur Bloom, part two of "More Than Meets the Eye" first aired in America on September 18, 1984. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Transformers: Transport to Oblivion Headquartered underwater, the Decepticons are able to create the "Space Bridge" that will enable them to return to Cybertron. The Autobots' efforts to prevent this are complicated by the seeming treachery of Bumblebee. Fortunately for the good Transfomers, the Space Bridge proves to be a temperamental invention. The first of the weekly Transformers episodes (after the three-chapter pilot "More Than Meets the Eye"), "Transport to Oblivion" was originally seen in America on October 6, 1984. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
  • Femme Fatales Collection

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 8, 2009

    Includes:Algiers (1938) The Strange Woman (1946) Whistle Stop (1946) Dishonored Lady (1947) Cause for Alarm (1951) The Naked Kiss (1964) Algiers This Hollywood remake of the French Pepe le Moko adheres so slavishly to its source that it utilizes stock footage from the original film, and even picked its actors on the basis of their resemblance to the French cast. Contrary to legend, star Charles Boyer never says "Come wizz me to zee Casbah"; as master criminal Pepe le Moko, he's already in the Casbah, a crook-controlled safe harbor which protects Pepe from the French authorities. Pepe's friendly enemy, police inspector Joseph Calleia, treats his pursuit of Pepe like a chess game, patiently waiting for his opponent to make that one wrong move. The ever-careful Pepe has the misfortune to fall hopelessly in love with tourist Hedy Lamarr (in her first American film). A combination of events, including the betrayal of Pepe by his castaway lover Sigrid Gurie and Hedy's tearful return to her ship when she is misinformed that Pepe is killed, lures the hero/villain into the open. Arrested by Calleia, Pepe begs for one last glance at his departing sweetheart. At this point in the French version, Pepe cheated the hangman by killing himself; this would never do in Production Code-dominated Hollywood, so Algiers contrives to have Pepe shot while trying to escape. Algiers was remade in 1948 as a musical, Casbah, starring Tony Martin. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide The Strange Woman B-movie auteur Edgar G. Ulmer managed to direct a few A-pictures during his long career; he was personally selected by Hedy Lamarr to helm this big-budget thriller, a project she put together to change her image as a starlet whose sex appeal outweighed her acting abilities. Set in the early 19th century, The Strange Woman takes place in Bangor, Maine, where logging and lumber mills have made the town prosperous. Jenny Hager (Lamarr) has grown up in Bangor, not far from the watchful eye of wealthy Isaiah Poster (Gene Lockhart). The fact that Jenny is twenty years Isaiah's junior does not stem his amorous intentions, and when she's finally out of her teens, Jenny accepts his proposal of marriage. But beneath her sweet exterior, Jenny is a shrewd, conniving women, and while she makes a fine life for herself with Isaiah's money, she obviously doesn't care for him. When Isaiah's son Ephraim (Louis Hayward) visits from college, Jenny is immediately attracted to him, and she tells him that she'll marry him if he murders his father. But, unknown to Ephraim, Jenny is already scheming to win the affections of businessman John Evered (George Sanders), even though he's pledged to marry her best friend Meg (Hillary Brooke). Based on a novel by Ben Ames Williams, The Strange Woman was generally considered one of Hedy Lamarr's best performances, although her best-known performance would continue to be in Ecstasy (1933), largely because of her then-daring nude scenes. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide Whistle Stop In this drama, Mary (Ava Gardner) returns to her small town after she becomes a success in the city. Meeting up with her old love, Kenny (George Raft), she discovers that he is still the unambitious, lazy man he was when she left, and she begins an affair with nightclub owner Lew Lentz (Tom Conway). When a jealous rivalry arises between Lew and Kenny, the results could be deadly. ~ Iotis Erlewine, All Movie Guide Dishonored Lady In this drama, Madeleine Damien (Hedy Lamarr) is a successful magazine editor with a free-spirited private life, but a number of failed relationships and years of burning the candle at both ends have taken their toll and Madeleine is suicidal and on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Her psychiatrist, Dr. Caieb (Morris Carnovsky), advises her to find a less stressful and more personally satisfying line of work, so Madeleine leaves the publishing industry and moves to a flat in Greenwich Village, where she pursues a long-standing dream of be
  • From Dusk Till Dawn Triple Pack

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 8, 2009

    Includes:From Dusk Till Dawn (1996), MPAA Rating: R From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money (1998), MPAA Rating: R From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter (1999), MPAA Rating: R From Dusk Till Dawn In this action-horror flick from director Robert Rodriguez and screenwriter Quentin Tarantino, Tarantino stars with George Clooney as a pair of bad-to-the-bone brothers named Seth and Richie Gecko. After a string of robberies that left a river of blood in the Geckos' wake, the sadistic siblings head to Mexico to live the good life. To get over the border, they kidnap Jacob Fuller, a widowed preacher played by Harvey Keitel, and his two children, Kate (Juliette Lewis) and Scott (Ernest Liu). Once south of the border, the quintet park their RV at a rough-and-tumble trucker bar called The Titty Twister, where Seth and Richie are supposed to meet a local thug. After a couple of drinks, they realize that they're not in a typical bar, as the entire place begins to teem with vicious, blood-sucking vampires. With the odds stacked greatly against them, the Fullers and Geckos team together in hopes of defeating the creatures of the night. Makeup artist Tom Savini and blaxploitation star Fred Williamson appear as allies against the vampires, and Cheech Marin fills three different roles. ~ Matthew Tobey, All Movie Guide From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money This sequel attempts to ape the inventive blend of horror, comedy, and crime melodrama of its predecessor, with some creative direction by actor Sam Spiegel, a protégé of Sam Raimi. Buck (Robert Patrick) is a former bank robber who's being watched closely by Sheriff Lawson (Bo Hopkins). Lawson's suspicions are well-founded, because Buck is indeed planning a multimillion-dollar bank heist in Mexico, to be aided by prison escapee Luther (Duane Whitaker), rodeo star C.W. (Muse Watson), dog trainer Jesus (Raymond Cruz) and security guard Ray Bob (Brett Harrelson). While on his way to meet up with the gang, Luther encounters bat-related car trouble near the Titty Twister, a dive bar featured in the first film. Offered a lift by Razor Eddie (Danny Trejo), Luther ends up with a pair of fangs in his neck. When he finally meets up with his cronies, Luther turns Jesus into a fellow vampire, unbeknownst to the rest of the gang, who proceed with their caper plans accompanied by two cohorts now more interested in blood than cash. The film was followed by a prequel, From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter (2000). ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter An outlaw who recently defied death by escaping his noose is on the run with his gang and the daughter of his intended executioner in this prequel to the 1996 series original, From Dusk Til Dawn. ~ All Movie Guide
  • Gunslinger Western Collection

    Type: Event | Date: Tuesday, Sep 8, 2009

    Includes:Se Incontri Sartana Prega Per la Tua Morte (1968) Run, Man, Run! (1968) Fistful of Lead (1970), MPAA Rating: R Il Cieco (1972) Django de Bastardo (1974), MPAA Rating: PG Se Incontri Sartana Prega Per la Tua Morte In this western, an engimatic stranger stops a stage from being robbed. ~ Sandra Brennan, All Movie Guide Run, Man, Run! A skillful thief with a penchant for knives attempts to outwit a slew of bloodthirsty treasure hunters in this brutal Italian Western from director Sergio Sollima. The gold they seek may be enough to finance the Mexican Revolution -- depending on who gets to it first and what they intend to do with it. Whether it's the thief Cuchillo (Tomas Milian), his passionate fiancée, the sheriff-turned-bounty-hunter, the ruthless bandits, or the fearsome American agents who end up with the gold, two things are certain -- the stakes are high and the competition is literally cutthroat. Run, Man, Run! also features music by Bruno Nicolai and the legendary film composer Ennio Morricone. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide Fistful of Lead When a bounty hunter watches an Old-West gold heist he sets out after the bandits in hopes of making their loot his. ~ All Movie Guide Il Cieco A sightless gunslinger and his "seeing-eye" steed is in charge of safely transporting 50 mail-order brides to an isolated Texas town. Unfortunately, a group of Mexican bandits have their own designs on the women. This comical Italian western follows the attempts of the blind hero to rescue them. By the time he gets there the women have decided that they have had enough of all men. ~ Sandra Brennan, All Movie Guide Django de Bastardo A mysterious, vengeful stranger rides into town and creates all sorts of havoc in this spaghetti western. It seems there are a number of people on his list and the day before he kills each one, he places a cross with that person's name on it in the middle of the street. It is a rough town, and many people die from the stranger's bullets. After exacting his final revenge, the stranger leaves the town as mysteriously as he came. ~ Sandra Brennan, All Movie Guide