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<p>No need to surrender yet, boys:&nbsp;&quot;Strike Back&quot;&nbsp;is coming back for a final season.</p>

No need to surrender yet, boys: "Strike Back" is coming back for a final season.

Credit: Cinemax

Cinemax renews 'Strike Back' for final season

One more year for the action drama that's always been better than it needed to be

The good news: Cinemax is bringing back its terrific action drama "Strike Back" for another season.

The bad news: it'll be the last one.

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Felicity Jones in "The Invisible Woman."
Felicity Jones in "The Invisible Woman."
Credit: Sony Classics

Roundup: Felicity Jones defeats category fraud

Also: Academy's e-voting upgrade, and screenwriters turning to adaptations

In last week's Best Supporting Actress contenders gallery, I mentioned how farcical it was that Felicity Jones was being campaigned in that category for her inarguable lead performance in the title role of Ralph Fiennes' biographical romance "The Invisible Woman" -- category fraud is a fixture of the race now, but some calls are still too dishonest to let stand. Evidently, enough people agreed for Sony Classics to let common sense prevail, as Scott Feinberg reports that the company has switched Jones' campaign to a leading one. A small victory on principle, then -- though Jones is unlikely to be nominated either way for her strong work in the film. (Now, how about an honest supporting campaign for Jones' superb co-star Joanna Scanlan?) [Hollywood Reporter

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'Sons of Anarchy's' Maggie Siff is pregnant


"Sons of Anarchy's" Maggie Siff is pregnant
Siff is expecting her first child, revealing the news via her Twitter bio's change to "future mom." No word yet if her pregnancy will have any impact on the FX series.


"The Good Wife" bosses explain "Hitting the Fan"
What will happen after this week's game-changing episode? PLUS: "Hitting the Fan" brought everything.


Alyssa Milano: CBS' "Charmed" reboot is too soon

Milano shared her thoughts on Twitter: "The thing about them doing a #charmed reboot is... it just... it feels like yesterday. It feels too close."


Jeff Probst will guest on "Two and a Half Men"
The "Survivor" host announced his Nov. 14 guest spot on Twitter, but didn't say if he'll be playing himself.


"Sleepy Hollow" is boosting tourism to Sleepy Hollow, New York
The tiny village in Westchester County has seen a threefold increase in tourism since the debut of the Fox series.


"SNL" puts "Don't Smash My Pumpkin" music video on the web

Watch Taran Killam's cut PSA. PLUS: "SNL" creates a Wes Anderson horror movie.


Martha Plimpton apologizes for calling Julianne Hough a "moron"
The "Raising Hope" star ranted on Twitter over Hough's blackface "Orange is the New Black" costume, saying: "Can we use this moment additionally to also recognize that elevating morons to celebrity status does not help the world in any way? Ever?"


Watch Greg Kinnear in Fox's "Rake"
Here's the first trailer for the Australian legal drama remake.


RIP Edna Krabappel: Remembering Marcia Wallace's "Simpsons" character
Here are Bart's teacher's 11 best episodes.


See the trailer for "Cosmos" from Seth MacFarlane and Neil deGrasse Tyson
Fox's "Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey" is a sequel to Carl Sagan's "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage."


Alfonso Ribeiro welcomes Alfonso Ribeiro Jr.
The "Fresh Prince" star welcomed his second child on Sunday.


Jason Sudeikis and Olivia Wilde are expecting
The couple met on the 2011 season finale of "Saturday Night Live."


"Simon & Simon" star Mary Carver dies
Carver, 89, played the mother of the two private-detective brothers.

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<p>Danny and Tim of &quot;The Amazing Race&quot;</p>

Danny and Tim of "The Amazing Race"

Credit: CBS

Recap: 'The Amazing Race' - 'Get Our Groove On'

It's off to Poland where a Double U-Turn awaits
I'm a little distracted by Game 4 of the World Series, so I may need to make this recap really simple.
 
Sunday (October 27) night's episode of "The Amazing Race" was a clean and solid hour of TV, without delivering anything truly spectacular. The Detour options each had advantages and disadvantages. The Roadblock offered the potential to be exhausting, even if it was built entirely on luck. The Double U-Turn came into play the way the producers wanted it to (even if I remain frustrated by the logistics of its implementation) and helped add drama to the episode. And a team I mostly like went home, which was disappointing, but at least they were gracious about it and they have nobody in particular to blame other than themselves. 
 
So yeah. A decent "Amazing Race" episode is a decent thing to have, even if it isn't nearly as decent as if the Red Sox could figure out where they left the best offense in the American League.
 
More after the break...
 
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<p>Nicholas D'Agosto and Lizzy Caplan in &quot;Masters of Sex.&quot;</p>

Nicholas D'Agosto and Lizzy Caplan in "Masters of Sex."

Credit: Showtime

Review: 'Masters of Sex' - 'Catherine'

Libby's pregnancy has a complication and Virginia's son rebels against her

A review of tonight's "Masters of Sex" — which Showtime recently renewed for a second season — coming up just as soon as I send you a dozen yellow roses...

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<p><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(62, 62, 62); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; ">If this season doesn't end with Kenny Powers and his dancing robot embarking on a road trip together, I am going to be bitterly disappointed.</span></p>

If this season doesn't end with Kenny Powers and his dancing robot embarking on a road trip together, I am going to be bitterly disappointed.

Credit: HBO/Fred Norris

Kenny Powers makes terrible choices and monkeys around on 'Eastbound & Down'

Is Kenny heading for a major fall?

"Water. Mother Nature's piss. It's what brings us here today."

Kenny Powers has learned absolutely nothing, and it terrifies me.

On the one hand, Kenny and April speak to each other in a way that they never could in previous seasons, and the scene where they're in bed at the beginning of the episode and Kenny's making it rain is both vintage Kenny but also tender in the only way he seems capable of being tender. He's kidding, of course, and he makes a few crazy ladyboy jokes, but underneath that, there's a different level of communication. When you look back at that first season, April is right to treat Kenny like he's garbage, because he pretty much is garbage. Maybe that's why I'm so invested in seeing Kenny pull things together this season. He's come so far, and if he ruins things this time, I don't see where he gets another chance at things down the road.

He's already defied the odds repeatedly, and it feels like he's unaware of just how lucky he's been.
Ken Marino's Guy Young is the wall that Kenny's racing towards at 150 MPH, and I'm not sure Kenny even knows where the brakes are. It's like Kenny has no radar whatsoever for when he's starting to seriously antagonize people, and he expects that when things in his life start going well, then everyone else has to feel the same way he feels. He wants to see April enjoying their new success the same way he's enjoying it, and he wants his brother (John Hawkes, who always grounds the show in a different sort of reality when he shows up) to forgive him for past offenses simply because he's flush, and he behaves like he's rich when the truth is that he's employed, and nothing more. Kenny strikes me as one of the most quintessential modern American characters on film or TV because of how firmly he seems to be able to simply shrug off reality when he doesn't like it.

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"Once Upon A Time"

 "Once Upon A Time"

Credit: ABC

'Once Upon A Time' recap: Do Hook and Emma finally hook up?

How Hook came to be a pirate is explored

At the start of the season, I couldn't wait to explore more of Hook's backstory on "Once Upon A Time." Now that we're in the dreary monotony of Neverland, it seems even more important to dig into his -- or, really, anyone's -- story just to get us out of the jungle. While what we learn about Hook isn't all that twisty or particularly insightful (there's still a lot of Hook to unravel, I'm sure), it's a reminder of what worked in the first season and what has been largely missing in this one. 

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<p>Julianna Margulies and Jess Weixler in &quot;The Good Wife.&quot;</p>

Julianna Margulies and Jess Weixler in "The Good Wife."

Credit: CBS

Review: 'The Good Wife' - 'Hitting the Fan'

Will and Alicia go to war with each other after news of the new firm gets out

Earlier this week, I wrote about how terrific this season of "The Good Wife" has been, and tonight's episode was a cut above even what's come before. A few specific thoughts coming up just as soon as I put my pants on so we can have a quorum...

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<p>Melissa McBridge as Carol in &quot;The Walking Dead.&quot;</p>

Melissa McBridge as Carol in "The Walking Dead."

Credit: AMC

Review: 'The Walking Dead' - 'Isolation'

The plague brings anger from Tyreese, regret from Carol and sacrifice from Hershel

A review of tonight's "The Walking Dead" coming up just as soon as I don't plan on much typing the next few days...

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<p>Saul (Mandy Patinkin)&nbsp;goes hunting on &quot;Homeland.&quot;</p>

Saul (Mandy Patinkin) goes hunting on "Homeland."

Credit: Showtime

Review: 'Homeland' - 'The Yoga Play'

Carrie risks her cover to help Dana, and Saul goes hunting for geese

A review of tonight's "Homeland" coming up just as soon as I'd be worried if I was a duck...

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<p>On &quot;Boardwalk Empire,&quot;&nbsp;Chalky White (Michael Kenneth Williams)&nbsp;makes a very public display against Dr. Narcisse.</p>

On "Boardwalk Empire," Chalky White (Michael Kenneth Williams) makes a very public display against Dr. Narcisse.

Credit: HBO

Review: 'Boardwalk Empire' - 'The Old Ship of Zion'

Chalky fights back against Narcisse, Sally comes to town and Eli gets some news

A review of tonight's "Boardwalk Empire" coming up just as soon as I mix myself a rum swizzle...

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<p>Lou Reed</p>

Lou Reed

Credit: AP Photo/Ric Francis

Remembering Lou Reed: My scariest interview

Revisiting my time with the icon

The most scared I’ve ever been before an interview was when I talked to Lou Reed in 1996. I was talent editor at Billboard and Reed, who died today,  was about to release “Set The Twilight Reeling,” an album composed entirely on the computer. It’s not that noteworthy a feat now, but it was then.

Reed’s acerbic, thorny reputation was well known, as was his love of esoteric theater, literature and music. I was raised on pop music and while I had grown to love the Velvet Underground and some of his solo material as my musical education expanded, to say I had any kind of vast knowledge about his past would be an overstatement. Add in that I was in awe of his use of language in his lyrics and in other interviews I'd read. I felt like I was being thrown into the deep end of the pool after only one swimming lesson.

I did a Music of Lou Reed crash course and it helped that I had truly loved his previous 1992 album, “Magic & Loss,” a meditation on death that touched me deeply, and understood how, in many ways, “Set the Twilight Reeling” was a pendulum-swinging reaction to that set.

Mainly, I just didn’t want to say something stupid—so the plan was to say very little—and I didn’t want him to be mean to me, as I knew he could be since so many of my colleagues proudly had their battle scars from tussles in the ring with the icon.

I went to his office/studio in Soho. It was a cold, crisp, beautifully clear January morning in New York, but I remember sweating in the taxi ride down from Billboard’s Times Square office because I was so nervous. So now I was worried about making a fool of myself and about sweating on a cranky legend.

Reed’s assistant buzzed me up to his office and there he was. It was a beautiful loft with lots of sunlight and not much furniture. Maybe I had been expecting some dark, wood-lined cave. Reed shook my hand, we sat on the couch, and, guess what? He was a pussy cat. I don’t just mean he didn’t eat me alive and I got out of there without crying (not that I would EVER do that in an interview). I mean he was downright sweet and—here's a word you don't hear said about him much—warm. I remember at one point we were laughing over something he said and I almost had an out-of-body experience. Maybe he appreciated that I wanted to talk about the new album (and had listened to it and prepared exhaustively) instead of pick his brain about the past. Maybe I just caught him on a good day.

My favorite part of the interview was when he revealed that he was an excellent typist as we discussed his computer skills. "When I was in high school, my parents made me take typing so I would have a job to fall back on," Reed said. "So Lou Reed of the Velvet Underground knows how to type."

He also expressed joy that he was still around to make music. "I'm happy I'm even walking on two legs,” he says. “Making rock records is kind of too good."

That was my only interview with Reed. In 2011, Reed screened a sweet movie about his 100-year old cousin, “Red Shirley,” at Sundance Film Festival and then performed before a very intimate audience at the Kimball Art Center. I remember sitting one row behind Reed at the screening and wanted to grab a few minutes with Reed and his manager, who had told me earlier that he would try to make that happen, waved me off. At his concert later on during the festival, his legendary crankiness returned during the 9-song set, while he just seemed rather uninterested in being there.

I’m glad I got him on a good day.

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