Latest Blog Posts

<p>&nbsp;Kylie Minogue</p>

 Kylie Minogue

Watch: Kylie Minogue struts her stuff through London in new video for 'Timebomb'

Will she wear that outfit to play for the Queen?

On “Timebomb,” Kylie Minogue sings “Time...time is moving so fast.” Maybe for the rest of us, but not for her. Minogue who spends much of the video in short jean shorts and a cropped motorcycle jacket (and sometimes less) looks amazing. Time has been very, very kind to the Aussie sensation.  In the Christian Larson-directed clip, she strolls through London streets on what looks like a rather chilly day compared to what everyone else is wearing, but she’s Super Kylie: she’s immune to feeling things like temperature.

[More after the jump...]

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<p>Mads Mikkelsen fights for his reputation in Thomas Vinterberg's 'The Hunt'</p>

Mads Mikkelsen fights for his reputation in Thomas Vinterberg's 'The Hunt'

Credit: Zentropa International

Review: Vinterberg's 'The Hunt' infuriates in all the right ways

A piercing examination of the aftermath of false accusation impresses deeply

CANNES - Thomas Vinterberg's 1998 film "The Celebration" was a blistering piece about repressed secrets as a form of familial cancer, and it established him as an important voice in Danish film on part with Lars Von Trier.  The films he's made since then have not worked with the same focus, but he's remained an interesting presence with the potential to put it all together again.

And now, with his new film "The Hunt," he's done exactly that.

It's interesting that you could read this as an almost direct inversion of "the Celebration," but I don't think that was by design.  Instead, Vinterberg began his process on this film by reading some disturbing reports on how children are so unclear on the notion of fantasy that they can lie with complete emotional conviction, and how adults, unclear on the way that works, can sometimes believe the unbelievable because of the source.  We tend to paint children in our culture as these pristine moral figures, and when I hear that, it makes me wonder if the people who believe that have ever actually met any children.  I love my kids, and I think they are well on their way to being good people.  But left to their own devices, kids are basically wild animals and morality is something we teach them, not something that is inherent to them.  They are driven by desire and need and powerful waves of emotion that they barely understand.

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<p>Robert Pattinson in &quot;Cosmopolis.&quot;</p>

Robert Pattinson in "Cosmopolis."

Credit: Entertainment One

Review: Robert Pattinson has a devil's haircut on his mind in Cronenberg's 'Cosmopolis'

Faithful but flummoxing adaptation of Don DeLillo's novel hits Cannes

CANNES - Eric Packer, the disaffected, boy-billionaire anti-hero of “Cosmopolis,” has an asymmetrical prostate. We’re told this no fewer than three times in David Cronenberg’s highly garrulous but bullet-cold adaptation of Don DeLillo’s compact 2003 novel, and it can’t just be to tease us with the reassuring prospect that there’s something imperfect about Robert Pattinson’s svelte, slicked, immaculately suited physique – nor just to amuse us with the notion that this sleek automaton of a protagonist has a prostate at all.

Rather, the image – though lifted straight from DeLillo’s novel, like pretty much everything in Cronenberg’s exceedingly faithful adaptation thereof – seems principally an assertion of the hand of David Cronenberg. That is, the funny, fevered, corporeally obsessed Cronenberg of old, the Cronenberg who became his own best adjective and has been only intermittently present, if not always to detrimental effect, in his last three or four films. After his intellectually heady but almost perversely restrained psychology drama, “A Dangerous Method,” debuted only months ago to polite critical applause that nonetheless questioned his edge, the hinky, kinky, defiantly unlovable “Cosmopolis” lands in our laps with bristly self-assurance. “You asked for this,” it seems to be saying, one of the few things unspoken amid its torrent of thematically pointed verbiage. “Let’s see if you really want it.”

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<p>Jason Isaacs in &quot;Awake.&quot;</p>

Jason Isaacs in "Awake."

Credit: NBC

'Awake' series finale interview with creator Kyle Killen

What would he have done differently? And what did the finale mean?
I had planned on writing a review of the series finale of "Awake." Then I watched the series finale of "Awake," which was fascinating at times, puzzling at others, and moving at still others. I felt like this was a situation where the best approach was to simply talk to the show's creator, Kyle Killen, about everything that happened, what it meant, and where the show might have gone if the ratings had been good enough to merit a second season. All of that coming up just as soon as I get my high heels fixed…
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<p>Cat Deeley of &quot;So You Think You Can Dance&quot;</p>

Cat Deeley of "So You Think You Can Dance"

Credit: FOX

Recap: 'So You Think You Can Dance' Season 9 Premiere - Dallas and New York Auditions

Cat Deeley, Nigel Lytho and company are back for another season

This is how I celebrate my first "American Idol"-free Thursday of the spring?

Weird, right?

Thursday (May 24) night is the two-hour season premiere of FOX's "So You Think You Can Dance" and, in honor of the season-starter, I'm gonna live-blog this sucker. I don't know if this will be a regular thing. In fact, I have my doubts for a few reasons:

1) I already know I probably won't be able to do next week, so I'm not going to get a Lou Gehrig-style streak going. 

2) I actually like "So You Think You Can Dance," but as a viewer. I'm not sure I feel the same way as a recapper. 

3) I don't know a darned thing about how to critique dancing, so I fear that my commentary will be full of empty words like "bendy" and "ab-tastic."

4) I don't know if anybody cares enough to read.

But for the purposes of the premiere? Let's get some live-blogging action going. And if you want more, read and comment and stuff...

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<p>&nbsp;Kelly Clarkson</p>

 Kelly Clarkson

Watch: Kelly Clarkson's new video for 'Dark Side'

What happens when we show our true selves?

We all have those parts of ourselves that we’re too scared to reveal to those we love. In the video for her new single, “Dark Side,” Kelly Clarkson asks if her partner could still love her once he sees that side of her?

Whether it’s the various situations depicted in the clip— body image issues, alcoholism and other addictions, war injuries— or our own different demons, Clarkson’s performance in the clip perfectly captures the vulnerability that comes with showing people our whole selves.

[More after the jump...]

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<p>Wiz Khalifa</p>

Wiz Khalifa

Credit: Atlantic

Watch: Wiz Khalifa's 'Work Hard, Play Hard' video takes the mantra literally

Rapper grabs construction workers to ballerinas to the ball

Wiz Khalifa's single "Work Hard, Play Hard" has its music video companion, and it features the rappers' mantra taken quite literally, with ballers, hard laborers and even ballerinas setting to work, then landing at his pad to play.

The track -- culled ahead of Wiz' Aug. 28 drop of album "O.N.I.F.C." -- could use a good remix. And frankly I'd take that third verse and set it on all sorts of fire due to criminal laziness. But the refrains sticks well, his matter-of-fact yopfills in the them nicely and it could crossover into all sorts of playlists.

Look out, Springsteen. Maybe Wiz is the new populism spokesdude.

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<p>Bruce Springsteen</p>

Bruce Springsteen

Credit: AP Photo

Watch: Bruce Springsteen's new clip for 'Rocky Ground'

Stark depiction matches song's message

Bruce Springsteen has had a strange relationship with videos. As someone who came into prominence before the MTV era, he’s always seemed to be a bit uneasy in clips and a little embarrassed to be there at all. Plus, as he is very well aware, no video is going to capture the magic that is the Boss as much as a live performance.

For  “Rocky Ground,” the second single from “Wrecking Ball,” he stays with the black and white motif he used for the album’s first single/clip, “We Take Care of Our Own”: black and white, stark images unified to tell a story rather than any kind of linear narrative.

[More after the jump...]

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<p>Beth Ditto in Gossip's &quot;Move in the Right Direction&quot;</p>

Beth Ditto in Gossip's "Move in the Right Direction"

Watch: Gossip 'Moves' back in time for 'Right Direction' video

Bad '90s hair for another cut from 'A Joyful Noise'

I love Beth Ditto and Gossip, but why did the band warp back to the 1990s No Doubt Hey Day to shoot their music video for "Move in the Right Direction?" What happened to the usually impeccable wardrobe? Why do the gay men look so sad and Ditto so happy? What's with the watered down flop-side-Donna-Summer?

Skip this particular green screen method in the future, it does no favors.

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<p>Redd Kross' &quot;Researching the Blues&quot;</p>

Redd Kross' "Researching the Blues"

Credit: Merge

Listen: Redd Kross' 'Blues' from first album in 15 years

Title track from Merge may take you back

Redd Kross haven't put out a new album in 15 years, but their return this year is marked with the "Blues."

"Researching the Blues" is the title track from the rock act's forthcoming Merge album, due on Aug. 7. Jeff McDonald is still sounding snotty as hell, bold in front of the matchy-matchy rhythm section. He wrote the record while brother Steven produced.

The lineup is rounded out by Roy McDonald (The Muffs) and a reunion with lead guitarist Robert Hecker, who played with the band through 1991.

Eddie Kurdziel replaced Hecker for 1993's "Phaseshifter," but died in 1999, after which the early-wave L.A. punk group went on indefinite hiatus, post-"Show World." Redd Kross has been performing in varying lineups for the last five years, but haven't released new music until now.

Check the group's website for tour dates.

What do you think of the song?

 

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<p>Anne Hathaway as Catwoman in new banner art for &quot;The Dark&nbsp;Knight Rises.&quot;</p>

Anne Hathaway as Catwoman in new banner art for "The Dark Knight Rises."

Credit: Warner Bros.

New 'The Dark Knight Rises' banner art and a sly Set Visit tease

What secrets lie in the city of three rivers?

Once upon a time, an intrepid band of reporters journeyed to where the three rivers meet, a quaint city once called Fort Du Quense and then Fort Pitt, before finally adopting the legendary moniker…Pittsburgh. We were on a pilgrimage to the Steel City to visit the set of one of the most anticipated films of the decade, Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises."  Little did we know that our embargoed journey would have 10-20,000 witnesses and major coverage from every available reporter from the local Pittsburgh media.  Yes, in this age of smartphones and YouTube it's hard to keep anything secret about a major movie that isn't being filmed inside a sound stage secret, but shoot it in Western Pennsylvania?  You might as well have invited TMZ to broadcast 24/7.  But, I digress…

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<p>Nicole Kidman in &quot;The Paperboy.&quot;</p>

Nicole Kidman in "The Paperboy."

Credit: Lionsgate

Review: 'The Paperboy' straddles the line between trash and treat

Lee Daniels's bonkers follow-up to 'Precious' aims for camp-classic status

CANNES - Here are a few things you should know about "The Paperboy," the humid, lurid and exuberantly ludicrous new thriller from Lee "Precious" Daniels -- that is, if the swarm of dumbfounded Twitter chatter about the film hasn't informed you already. It features Nicole Kidman bitch-fighting a group of sunbathers for the privilege of urinating on Zac Efron's jellyfish sting, triumphing with the immediately immortal line, "If anybody's gonna piss on him, it's gonna be me!" It features Zac Efron dancing in the rain clad in nothing but a pair of tighty-whiteys rapidly losing their opacity. It features a close-up of Nicole Kidman's panty-covered crotch, as she publicly masturbates in front of three other men during a prison visit. It features Macy Gray as a weary, sass-talking Southern maid, her omniscient narration musing idly on the inappropriateness of a Kidman/Efron sex scene. Another sex scene, meanwhile, is punctuated with cutaways to alligators and grazing hogs.

By this point -- and make no mistake, I've scarcely skimmed through my notes here -- you've either made a mental note to be doing charity work in Eritrea when the film hits theaters, or you're already on the advance-booking hotline. On either score, you should probably trust your instincts. Critics can argue back and forth as to the level of knowingness at play here, but “The Paperboy” is a film built on its distended absurdities and polyester styling – certainly more than Pete Dexter’s cracking, tonally far slinkier, source novel, which comes in for some brutal renovation here, presumably more at Daniels’ hand than his own. (Both are credited as co-writers.)

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