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<p>Jack White and Ruby Amanfu at ACL&nbsp;on Saturday</p>

Jack White and Ruby Amanfu at ACL on Saturday

Credit: Katie Hasty

Review: Jack White at Austin City Limits, and the lady limit

Watch: ACL's Red, White and Black brothers have a counterweight

"God Bless Neil Young."

Jack White didn't say much during his hour-and-a-half headlining set on Saturday night, but those were his last ones before departing, to probably hop on a golf cart and go watch the rest of Neil Young and Crazy Horse.

White and Young played at opposite ends of Zilker Park during the 2012 Austin City Limits music festival on Saturday night, a truly difficult scheduling quandary during this rock-centered fest. Whereas other major festivals will set up hip-hop versus album rock, or dance stage versus popular reunion, Saturday put rock legend versus growing rock legend up against one another, both starting at the same time, though Crazy Horse played 'til the bitter, bitter (10 p.m.) end of the night.

The Third Man Records man tore through most of his album "Blunderbuss" and cranked out the Raconteurs hit "Steady As She Goes," plus cuts from multiple eras of the White Stripes catalog including "Slowly Turning Into You," "Hotel Yorba," "Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground" and "We're Going to Be Friends."

It's on the latter two that White's genesis from slapdash guitar genius to nimble Everything, Every Time, Man is apparent, as he switched between electric guitar and organ sometimes in the same phrase, and transformed a simple childlike melody into a full-bodied glammy jam.

White has gotten guff before for this kind of behavior -- this Serious behavior. When White Stripes records sunk into to psych after three albums of workshopped garage echoes, when his band when from a two piece to a three or four, and now that six-piece full backing band and the crew is synchronized, styled and shined.

Furthermore: there have been complaints that the current backing band The Peacocks is all-female, after an apparent 21st-century eye-opening that novelty could infringe on Serious Art. I say it'd be a problem if White hasn't spent half his career championing, embracing and nurturing female artists, combining with them or collaborating so that they could stand alone: Loretta Lynn, the Black Belles, Wanda Jackson, Ruby Amanfu, Alicia Keys, Karen Elson, Norah Jones, The White Stripes...

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<p>Suraj Sharma in &quot;Life of Pi&quot;</p>

Suraj Sharma in "Life of Pi"

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Off the Carpet: Kicking the habit, seeing the light

Looking for meaning in the season as the 50th annual NYFF comes to a close

I haven't started to look at the 2012 awards season in terms of "the year of" because it's a fool's errand. That kind of thing just bubbles up and hits you one day and it becomes clear that, however inadvertently, the season's awards product hovers around similar ideas and notions, or at least that they can be molded around same.

However, after taking in Robert Zemeckis's "Flight" for a second time last night as the 50th annual New York Film Festival drew to a close, I started to note some things. The spirituality of the film, which I was aware of initially but which really began to stand out a second time, remained intriguing. And it struck me as somewhat poignant that it served as a bookend to the fest with opening night presentation "Life of Pi," a film very much about the search for faith and its power when it takes hold, whatever one might put one's faith in.

"Flight" screenwriter John Gatins was quick to go into all of that at the Stone Rose Lounge closing night party overlooking Columbus Circle. He was working through a few things when he wrote the script and the notion of "there are no atheists in foxholes" led to "there are no atheists on crashing airplanes" and that took him on a whole other journey of reflecting his flawed protagonist's faith through a variety of prisms throughout the script.

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<p>Naomi Watts and Tom Holland in &quot;The Impossible.&quot;</p>

Naomi Watts and Tom Holland in "The Impossible."

Credit: Summit Entertainment

Roundup: 'The Impossible' does just about that in Spain

Also: Stop-motion versus CGI, and Dustin Hoffman 'breaks through'

With the greatest of respect to a beautiful country, Spain's box office doesn't usually rate much of a mention -- but it seem worth mentioning when it addresses at least one question mark hovering over one of this year's Oscar hopefuls. Juan Antonio Bayona's tsunami drama "The Impossible" didn't get quite the level of buzz some expected out of Toronto: many reviews were strong, but others took issue with the filmmakers' decision to turn the true-life story of a Spanish family, the Belons, into one about a fictional British brood, allowing for more Hollywood-friendly casting. As it turns out, Spanish audiences couldn't care less: the film has been a domestic smash, shattering local records with its opening four-day gross. Will it connect with audiences Stateside in a tough holiday release slot? [Variety

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"The Real Housewives of New Jersey"

"The Real Housewives of New Jersey"

Credit: Bravo

Recap: The final part of 'The Real Housewives of New Jersey' reunion

Andy Cohen declares this last installment is 'all out war'

It's the final installment of the three-part "The Real Housewives of New Jersey" reunion, and I'm really looking forward to this long, ugly rehashing of the season being wrapped up for good. I mean, this isn't the "Star Wars" or "Lord of the Rings" trilogy; this is a bunch of women screaming at each other for hours and hours on end. Given that the blood feud that started the reunion has shown no signs of being resolved, I guess this means another hour of insults. Yay, insults. But Andy Cohen declares that this episode will be "all out war," which makes me wonder what the previous two hours were -- war-ish? Skirmishes? What? 

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<p>On &quot;Trem&eacute;,&quot;&nbsp;Albert (Clarke Peters)&nbsp;and his Indians strut their stuff.</p>

On "Tremé," Albert (Clarke Peters) and his Indians strut their stuff.

Credit: HBO

Review: 'Tremé' - 'The Greatest Love'

The locals try something new, and Albert has a showdown at Indian practice

A quick review of tonight's "Tremé" coming up just as soon as I sacrifice a sock to the music gods...

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<p>Claire Danes and Mandy Patinkin in &quot;Homeland.&quot;</p>

Claire Danes and Mandy Patinkin in "Homeland."

Credit: Showtime

Review: 'Homeland' - 'State of Independence'

It's a long, dark night for Carrie, Brody and Jessica

A review of tonight's "Homeland" coming up just as soon as I forget my jack...

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<p>Gary and Will of &quot;The Amazing Race&quot;</p>

Gary and Will of "The Amazing Race"

Credit: CBS

Recap: 'The Amazing Race' - 'There's No Crying in Baseball'

Pedicabs and trains cause more trouble than challenges
I want to get into this week's recap, but first I have a proposal for the producers of "The Amazing Race": From here on out, whether in this season or in any subsequent season, any contestant who yells at a service employee in a Third World country and tells them either that they just lost them the Race or that they just lost them a million dollars, should be automatically eliminated on the spot. 
 
If you are yelling at a pedicab driver in Indonesia, where the median income is $3800 a year, and verbally abusing him for costing you a million dollars, you're pretty much a horrible person and you pretty much represent the worst America has to offer in the global community.
 
This rule needn't only apply in Third World countries. Anywhere you yell at a service employee for costing you a million dollars, unless you're in a cab driven by Donald Trump or you were denied a plane ticket by Mark Cuban, it's best to save your whining for somebody else.
 
Who's with me on this one?
 
And now, on to the recap, after the break...
 
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<p>Danai Gurira as Michonne in &quot;The Walking Dead.&quot;</p>

Danai Gurira as Michonne in "The Walking Dead."

Credit: AMC

Season premiere review: 'The Walking Dead' - 'Seed'

Rick and the group seek shelter in an abandoned prison

"The Walking Dead" is back for a new season. I reviewed the beginning of the season on Thursday, and I have a few specific thoughts on the season premiere coming up just as soon as I eat an owl...

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<p>Van Alden (Michael Shannon)&nbsp;and Sigrid (<span class="st">Christiane Seidel)&nbsp;in &quot;Boardwalk Empire.&quot;</span></p>

Van Alden (Michael Shannon) and Sigrid (Christiane Seidel) in "Boardwalk Empire."

Credit: HBO

Review: 'Boardwalk Empire' - 'You'd Be Surprised'

Van Alden and Gyp receive visitors and Nucky tries to play producer

A review of tonight's "Boardwalk Empire" coming up just as soon as I get you some Passover vodka...

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<p>Daniel Craig in &quot;Skyfall.&quot;</p>

Daniel Craig in "Skyfall."

Credit: Columbia Pictures

Review: Bond takes it personally in high-shine 'Skyfall'

Javier Bardem and Roger Deakins are the stars of the series' 23rd entry

In case the marketing spiel has somehow escaped you, James Bond is 50 years old this year. Well, maybe a bit older – he wasn’t exactly a newborn in “Dr. No” – or a bit younger, if you choose to take only 44-year-old Daniel Craig’s salt-and-pepper-stubbled visage into account. Either way, he’s not young anymore, and boy, does “Skyfall” ever want you to know that.

“Brave new world,” 007 mutters grumpily, after his first encounter with a whizzy new Q (Ben Whishaw) who scarcely needs to shave yet. “Old dog, new tricks,” twinkles Naomie Harris’s sexy MI6 underling, her tone vaguely patronizing, as if teaching an elderly uncle how to send an email. 

As such platitudes suggest, clever quippery is not one of the many strengths of Bond’s 23rd feature outing. They aren’t even accurate: the perma-dapper spy isn’t learning any new tricks, but rediscovering ones fallen into disuse, like scuffed Oxfords polished to a high shine. The same goes for “Skyfall,” which endearingly stresses fashionably analog traditionalism at every turn: Bond’s gadgets are restricted to a gun and a radio, the beloved, Connery-era Aston Martin makes a reappearance, while for the bulk of the action, far-flung locales are curbed in favour of the Land of Hope and Glory. (In Britain’s banner year of Jubilee and Olympic celebration, that can’t be an accident.) Another old-school touch, Adele’s Bassey-aping title ballad, is pretty splendid, but they may as well have gone with a big-band cover of “Everything Old Is New Again.”

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"Long Island Medium"

 "Long Island Medium:

Credit: TLC

HitFix Exclusive: Watch the 'Long Island Medium' call up the unborn

She talks to a woman's dead friend - and finds someone else, too

It turns out that you don't even have to be born to qualify as one of the undead popping up on the radar of Theresa Caputo, the star of "Long Island Medium" (Sundays, 9 p.m.)  In this exclusive clip, Caputo finds a woman's best friend, Brian, on the other side. Brian, who died in a motorcycle accident almost eight years prior, sends his regards -- and also lets the medium know that he's taking care of the woman's unborn child. Good to know that you can put your dead friends to work as babysitters, at least in the after life. 

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<p>Danai Gurira of &quot;The Walking Dead&quot;</p>

Danai Gurira of "The Walking Dead"

Credit: AMC

Interview: 'Walking Dead' star Danai Gurira discusses becoming Michonne

New co-star chats about secrecy and swordwork
To "Walking Dead" fans versed solely in the hit AMC drama, she's merely the katana-wielding stranger introduced saving Laurie Holden's Andrea in the second season finale.
 
To fans of the comic series, though, she's Michonne, one of the franchise's most beloved characters. 
 
Played by Danai Gurira, Michonne will be a key part of the third "Walking Dead" season, which premieres on Sunday (October 14) night. But don't worry. This interview spoils very little about Michonne. Instead, Gurira and I discussed her extensive physical training for the role, as well as the challenges of coming to regular television after cutting her teeth in theater and independent films like "The Visitor."
 
We also talked about our shared background in Grinnell, Iowa where both of our fathers were on the faculty at the same time more than 30 years ago. I left that part out of the transcript. Apologies. There's still plenty here.
 
Click through for the full interview... And for more pre-premiere "Walking Dead" coverage, check out my interview with producers Robert Kirkman & Glen Mazzara.
 
 
 
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