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<p>Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper do career-best work in David O. Russell's eminently charming 'Silver Linings Playbook'</p>

Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper do career-best work in David O. Russell's eminently charming 'Silver Linings Playbook'

Credit: The Weinstein Company

Review: 'Silver Linings Playbook' plays by the rules but gets it all right

Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper have never been better

I haven't read Matthew Quick's novel, but I can see why David O. Russell was drawn to the material, and it feels like both the most commercial thing he's ever made and the most personal.  After all, Russell is as well known for his on-set difficulties with anger as he is for the films themselves, and I'm sure there are people who have worked with him who would be happy to call him crazy.  "Silver Linings Playbook" is about embracing whatever madness drives us, and it certainly seems like Russell is a guy who manages to make the most of his gifts no matter what his demons.

Pat (Bradley Cooper) has been in a mental hospital under court order for eight months as the film opens, and it's time for him to go home.  His mother Delores (Jacki Weaver) comes to get him, and right away, we get a sense that something terrible happened to land him in there in the first place.  Pat is determined to stay out, to rebuild his life, and when he speaks of his wife Nikki (Brea Bee), it's apparent that he believes they are going to get back together.  It may not be that easy, though, and in the flashbacks we see, their relationship ended with a shocking act of violence on the heels of a betrayal, and while Pat may believe he's got a future with Nikki, it's pretty obvious he's fooling himself.

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Matt and Amy Roloff

 Matt and Amy Roloff

Credit: TLC

The star of 'Little People, Big World' talks family and bridezillas

The Roloffs say staying married means 'not liking each other sometimes'

After six seasons of "Little People, Big World," Matt and Amy Roloff seemingly rode into the syndication sunset in 2010, happy to work on their massive farm near Portland, Oregon and watch their four kids flutter out of the nest. But TLC has announced that the Roloffs are returning to the series grind with "Little People Big World: Wedding Farm" (premiering Tues. Nov. 13 at 9:00 p.m.), a six-episode series following the couple's decision to get into the wedding industry. Amy talked to HitFix about why she and Matt took on yet another endeavor, how they've managed to stay married for 25 years, and why she refuses to renew her vows on TV, even though they have the perfect venue right in their own backyard. 

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<p>How to Destroy Angels</p>

How to Destroy Angels

Review: Trent Reznor's How to Destroy Angels' EP 'An Omen'

Can this hybrid of talent amount to much on its second go?
With the release of their first self-titled EP and now with “An Omen,” How To Destroy Angels have proven to be a much leaner, cleaner-sounding crew than Trent Reznor’s other band. In conjunction with longtime collaborator Atticus Ross and Mariqueen Maandig, Reznor tries to configure the drones and squirrely, processed matter around calculated acoustic rhythms and electronic melodies, as the Nine Inch Nails frontman trades vocal spaces with Maandig when he’s not outright absent. he band is at its best at combining its talents on the sixth of six tunes, “Speaking in Tongues,” a journey-is-the-destination ellipsis of noise and rising melodies.
 
But at its worst, “An Omen” is dispassionate and utterly unextraordinary, and it’s this for at least half the tunes. Reznor and Ross’ work on “The Social Network,” for instance, had similar minimalist strains, but at least didn’t lack in emotionality; the formula here is off, sometimes lost in drab lyricism. On “Keep It Together” Maandig and Reznor sing “I can’t keep it together” in staggered time like a broken round, because – get it? – they can’t seem to keep it together. “The Loop Closes” sings “the beginning is the end / keeps coming around again” over and over again because, again, get it?
 
“Ice Age” is more like a workshop tune, and unproven model, where the band appears to be recreating the band Califone inside of ProTools with Maandig’s practiced, calm voice wandering off in another sonic direction. That track, like the slow-building “The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters” has all the trappings of an interesting hybrid of tone and talent. However, it doesn’t amount to much.
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<p>Hayden Panettiere at the CMA&nbsp;Awards</p>

Hayden Panettiere at the CMA Awards

Credit: AP Photo

Is Hayden Panettiere's 'Telescope' a real hit or a novelty?

Can the 'Nashville' star become a country star herself?

Hayden Panettiere has a top 40 country hit, but is it real?  In an art-imitates-life-imitates-art way, Big Machine Records, home to such artists as Taylor Swift, released “Telescope,” a song Panettiere’s character, Juliette Barnes, sang on the ABC series “Nashville.” 

[More after the jump...]

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<p>THR's 2012 Actor&nbsp;Roundtable</p>

THR's 2012 Actor Roundtable

Credit: The Hollywood Reporter

Arkin, Damon, Foxx, Gere, Hawkes and Washington in THR's Actor Roundtable

Six of the season's fixtures mull over fear and fame

I finally got around to watching The Hollywood Reporter's Actor Roundtable this morning, an annual gathering of top names in the awards race and always a solid, informative, open chat. Participating this year was Alan Arkin ("Argo"), Matt Damon ("Promised Land"), Jamie Foxx ("Django Unchained"), Richard Gere ("Arbitrage"), John Hawkes ("The Sessions") and Denzel Washington ("Flight").

Much of the discussion revolved around what fame and the business has meant on a deeper level for the actors, their socio-political invigoration as a result of being public figures and how fear still feeds them even in times of success. And for Damon, who took off at an early age ("Good Will Hunting" landed when he was 27-years-old), it was jarring to witness what the transition to stardom really meant.

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"Doomsday Preppers"

 "Doomsday Preppers"

Credit: NatGeo

10 things you didn't know about 'Doomsday Preppers'

They may be ready for the end, but they're not as crazy as you think

Are you prepared for the end of the world? No? Well, most people aren't -- unless they're preppers. To kick off the second season of the NatGeo show "Doomsday Preppers" (Tues. Nov. 13, 9:00 p.m. ET), I sat down with some preppers -- Jay and Holly Blevins, Braxton and Kara Southwick and professional prepper (and show advisor) Scott Hunt -- to find out what keeps them up at night (not as much as you'd think). "There are a lot of grasshoppers jumping around, tweeting, Facebooking, all sorts of things, and the ants are planning, storing and doing just fine," Hunt explained. Here are ten things you may not have known about some seemingly normal families who just may have a lot more dehydrated stew in their possession than you do.

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<p>Matthew Perry and Tyler James Williams in a scene from tonight's &quot;Go On.&quot;</p>

Matthew Perry and Tyler James Williams in a scene from tonight's "Go On."

Credit: NBC

Between grief and nothing: Catching up on 'Go On'

Matthew Perry sitcom hasn't gotten much funnier, but is much more comfortable in its skin

When Matthew Perry's new NBC sitcom "Go On" debuted back during the Summer Olympics, I wasn't entirely sure what to make of it. On the one hand, it seemed a better vehicle for Perry than "Mr. Sunshine" (Yay) did, and the writing seemed to take the idea of a grief support group seriously. On the other, the pilot felt an awful lot like the first episode of "Community," a niche comedy representing a creative direction NBC was openly desperate to get away from, and the pilot, while tasteful in its comedy, also wasn't incredibly funny. Could this possibly work, or would this be yet another high-concept sitcom trying to forget its premise as quickly as possible?

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<p>A scene from &quot;Wreck-It Ralph.&quot;</p>

A scene from "Wreck-It Ralph."

Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

Roundup: Is there a Disney/Pixar identity crisis?

Also: Affleck recognized as a Modern Master, and 'Les Mis' cast goes Vogue

Are the Disney and Pixar animation brands beginning to merge into each other? Josh L. Dickey is asking the question, as he notes that Pixar's tradition-focused summer hit "Brave" seemed to borrow significantly from the classic Disney storybook, while Disney's current smash "Wreck-It Ralph" is a hi-tech, pop-savvy firecracker that seems more informed by the contemporary Pixar model of crossover entertainment. (Dickey also wonders if "Ralph"'s box office performance would be even more impressive if it had been released under the Pixar label.) Are the twin houses going to borrow more from each other from here on out, or should Disney be mindful of preserving its more old-school identity? With their next film a Hans Christian Andersen fairytale adaptation, perhaps the overlap is temporary. [Variety]

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<p>Barney (Neil Patrick Harris)&nbsp;and Robin (Cobie Smulders)&nbsp;on &quot;How I&nbsp;Met Your Mother.&quot;</p>

Barney (Neil Patrick Harris) and Robin (Cobie Smulders) on "How I Met Your Mother."

Credit: CBS

Review: 'How I Met Your Mother' - 'Splitsville'

The gang pushes Robin to dump Nick, and Marshall and Ted play basketball

A quick review of last night's "How I Met Your Mother" coming up just as soon as I buy a ticket to see "Groins On Ice" at Madison Square Garden...

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"The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills"

 "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills"

Credit: Bravo

'The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills' recap: 'The Higher the Heel, the Closer to God'

Adrienne and Lisa still can't play nice - even at a kiddie birthday party

This week, we don't see much of new housewife Yolanda, but no matter. What we do see is enough to convince me that she's going to be a force for crazy for the rest of the season. Really, even if the rest of the wives dove head first into talk therapy to emerge as sweet and bland as packets of single serve artificially flavored apple cinnamon oatmeal, we'd still be plenty amused watching Yolanda spin around in circles trying to rationalize her inescapable nuttiness. But, as we know, the other housewives are just as catty and ridiculous as ever, so unleash the crazy!

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'Breaking Dawn' stars Elizabeth Reaser and Nikki Reed talk spinoffs for their 'Twilight' characters

'Breaking Dawn' stars Elizabeth Reaser and Nikki Reed talk spinoffs for their 'Twilight' characters

What were the last days on set like for the actresses playing Esme and Rosalie?
Much has been made of the closeness shared by the actors who made up the Cullen family in the "Twilight" franchise and certainly sitting down with Elizabeth Reaser and Nikki Reed, it's possible to get the feeling that reporters are just passing in and out of a lengthy, ongoing conversation between two close friends.
 
In my portion of that long, ongoing conversation, Reaser and Reed discuss their respective last days of shooting on "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1" -- One of them rushed to the airport immediately, while the other one stuck around and shared some emotions with a co-star -- and the final grace notes for Esme and Rosalie that they wish the film had had time for.
 
And, because Hollywood bean counters probably aren't going to be ready to bid adieu to the cash cow that is the "Twilight" franchise, Reaser shares her version of a perfect "Twilight" spinoff around her character, which sounds like something Stephenie Meyer should get to work on immediately.
 
I've already posted my "Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2" interviews with Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner. Expect more as we get closer to Friday's (Nov. 16) premiere...
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<p>Keira Knightley and Aaron Taylor-Johnson lose themselves to passion in Joe Wright's daring new film version of Leo Tolstoy's 'Anna Karenina'</p>

Keira Knightley and Aaron Taylor-Johnson lose themselves to passion in Joe Wright's daring new film version of Leo Tolstoy's 'Anna Karenina'

Credit: Focus Features

Review: Keira Knightley is electric in bold new take on Tolstoy's 'Anna Karenina'

Joe Wright and his favorite actress deliver again with a fascinating new film

Joe Wright's breakthrough film was "Pride and Prejudice," a very well-made and spirited adaptation of the frequently adapted novel by Jane Austen.  While I admired the craftsmanship, I had already reached an oversaturation point with the material itself. It is safe to say that I never need to see another production of "Pride" in any format, or a loose adaptation or a re-imagining or pretty much any version.  It wasn't Wright's problem, but mine.

His adaptation of Ian McEwan's "Atonement" was far more impressive to me, and that was a case of familiarity with the source material adding to the impact of the film.  I thought it was a book that really couldn't work as a film, and yet working with Christopher Hampton, as smart an adapter as one could hope to hire, Wright turned a largely internal piece of work into something cinematic and visually dynamic.  "The Soloist" felt like Hollywood trying to absorb Wright and turn him into a studio filmmaker, someone they could plug into pretty much anything, but with "Hanna," Wright seems to have reclaimed his voice and once again demonstrated that his keen eye for material (it was a great script by Seth Lochhead and David Farr) is better served when he's able to be daring, to come at things from a slightly left-of-center perspective.

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